Telescope meaning

tĕlĭ-skōp
The definition of a telescope is an optical instrument that makes far away objects look closer by using a special arrangement of lenses and mirrors.

An optical instrument you use to look at the stars that makes the stars appear closer is an example of a telescope.

noun
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An arrangement of lenses or mirrors or both that gathers light, permitting direct observation or photographic recording of distant objects.
noun
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Any of various devices, such as a radio telescope, used to detect and observe distant objects by their emission, absorption, or reflection of electromagnetic radiation.
noun
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To slide inward or outward in or as if in overlapping cylindrical sections.

A camp bucket that telescopes into a disk.

verb
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To cause to slide inward or outward in overlapping sections, as the cylindrical sections of a small hand telescope do.
verb
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To make more compact or concise; condense.
verb
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To cause to telescope.
verb
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To condense; shorten, as by combining parts, compressing, etc.
verb
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An arrangement of lenses, mirrors, or both that collects visible light, allowing direct observation or photographic recording of distant objects. &diamf3; A refracting telescope uses lenses to focus light to produce a magnified image. Compound lenses are used to avoid distortions such as spherical and chromatic aberrations. &diamf3; A reflecting telescope uses mirrors to view celestial objects at high levels of magnification. Most large optical telescopes are reflecting telescopes because very large mirrors, which are necessary to maximize the amount of light received by the telescope, are easier to build than very large lenses.
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Any of various devices, such as a radio telescope, used to detect and observe distant objects by collecting radiation other than visible light.
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A monocular optical instrument possessing magnification for observing distant objects, especially in astronomy.
noun
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Any instrument used in astronomy for observing distant objects (such as a radio telescope).
noun
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To extend or contract in the manner of a telescope.
verb
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To slide or pass one within another, after the manner of the sections of a small telescope or spyglass.
verb
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To come into collision, as railway cars, in such a manner that one runs into another.
verb
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An optical instrument for making distant objects, as the stars, appear nearer and consequently larger: it consists of two or more lenses or mirrors.
noun
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Having parts that slide one inside another.
adjective
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To have one part slide into another part like the concentric tubes of a small, collapsible telescope.
verb
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To come into contact with such force that the colliding parts become compressed.
verb
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Origin of telescope

  • New Latin telescopium or Italian telescopio both from Greek tēleskopos far-seeing tēle- tele- skopos watcher spek- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • tele- +"Ž -scope. From Latin telescopium, from Ancient Greek τηλεσκόπος (tÄ“leskopos, “far-seeing"), from τῆλε (tÄ“le, “afar") + σκοπέω (skopeō, “I look at").

    From Wiktionary

  • Coined in 1611 by the Greek mathematician Giovanni Demisiani for one of Galileo Galilei's instruments presented at a banquet at the Accademia dei Lincei.

    From Wiktionary