Lash definition

lăsh
To strike against with force or violence.

Sleet lashing the roof.

verb
4
0
To beat or swing rapidly.

The alligator lashed its tail in the water.

verb
3
0
Punishment administered with a whip.
noun
2
0
To strike with or as if with a whip.
verb
2
0
To drive or goad; sting.

Words that lashed them into action.

verb
1
0
Advertisement
To move swiftly or violently; thrash.

Heard the snake lashing about in the leaves.

verb
1
0
To secure or bind, as with a rope, cord, or chain.
verb
1
0
A whip, esp. the flexible striking part as distinguished from the handle.
noun
1
0
A stroke with or as with a whip; switch.
noun
1
0
A sharp, censuring or rebuking remark.
noun
1
0
Advertisement
To strike or drive with or as with a lash; flog.
verb
1
0
To swing or move quickly or angrily; switch.

The cat lashed her tail.

verb
1
0
To make a scathing oral or written attack against.
verb
1
1
The definition of lash is defined as to whip, swing quickly or strike with force.

An example of to lash is hitting someone with a tree branch.

verb
0
0
An eyelash.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
A stroke or blow with or as if with a whip.
noun
0
0
A whip.
noun
0
0
The flexible portion of a whip, such as a plait or thong.
noun
0
0
A lacerating presence or power.

The lash of conscience.

noun
0
0
A caustic verbal attack.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
To make a scathing verbal or written attack. Often used with out .

Lashed out at her critics during the interview.

verb
0
0
To aim a sudden blow; strike.

The mule lashed out with its hind legs.

verb
0
0
To beat; flail.

Waves lashing at the shore.

verb
0
0
To strike with great force; dash against.

Waves lashed the cliffs.

verb
0
0
To attack violently in words; censure or rebuke.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
To incite by appealing to the emotions.

To lash a crowd into a frenzy of anger.

verb
0
0
To move quickly or violently; switch.
verb
0
0
To make strokes with or as with a whip.
verb
0
0
To fasten or tie with a rope, etc.
verb
0
0
The thong or braided cord of a whip, with which the blow is given.

I observed that your whip wanted a lash to it. "” Joseph Addison.

noun
0
0
Advertisement
A stroke with a whip, or anything pliant and tough.

The culprit received thirty-nine lashes.

noun
0
0
A stroke of satire or sarcasm; an expression or retort that cuts or gives pain; a cut.

The moral is a lash at the vanity of arrogating that to ourselves which succeeds well. "” Roger L'Estrange.

noun
0
0
A hair growing from the edge of the eyelid; an eyelash.
noun
0
0
In carpet weaving, a group of strings for lifting simultaneously certain yarns, to form the figure.
noun
0
0
To strike with a lash; to whip or scourge with a lash, or with something like one.

We lash the pupil, and defraud the ward. "” John Dryden.

verb
0
0
Advertisement
To strike forcibly and quickly, as with a lash; to beat, or beat upon, with a motion like that of a lash.

The whale lashes the sea with its tail.

And big waves lash the frighted shores. "” John Dryden.

verb
0
0
To throw out with a jerk or quickly.

He falls, and lashing up his heels, his rider throws. "” John Dryden.

verb
0
0
To scold; to berate; to satirize; to censure with severity.

To lash vice.

verb
0
0
To bind with a rope, cord, thong, or chain, so as to fasten.

To lash something to a spar.

Lash a pack on a horse's back.

verb
0
0
(intransitive) To ply the whip; to strike.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
(intransitive) To utter censure or sarcastic language.

To laugh at follies, or to lash at vice. "” John Dryden.

verb
0
0
(intransitive, of rain) To fall heavily, especially in the phrase lash down.
verb
0
0
adjective
0
0
(Mid-Ulster, Northern Ireland) Excellent, wonderful.

We're off school tomorrow, it's gonna be lash!

That chinese (food) was lash!

adjective
0
0
Drunk.
adjective
0
0
Advertisement
An eyelash.
noun
0
1
lash out
  • to strike out violently
  • to speak angrily or in bitter criticism
idiom
0
0

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
lash
Plural:
lashes

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of lash

  • Middle English lashen, lasen to lace from Old French lachier, lacier from Vulgar Latin laceāre from Latin laqueāre to ensnare from laqueus snare lace

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English probably from lashen to deal a blow perhaps of imitative origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French lasche (French lâche).

    From Wiktionary