Thong meaning

thông, thŏng
Frequency:
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A narrow strip, as of leather, used for binding or lashing.
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A whip of plaited leather or cord.
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A sandal held on the foot by a strip that fits between the first and second toes and is connected to a strap usually passing over the top or around the sides of the foot.
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A garment for the lower body that exposes the buttocks, consisting of a narrow strip of fabric that passes between the thighs supported by a waistband.
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A narrow strip of leather, etc. used as a lace, strap, etc.
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A whiplash, as of plaited strips of hide.
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A strip of leather.
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(usually in the plural, Australia, US) An item of footwear, usually of rubber, secured by two straps which join to pass between the big toe and its neighbour.
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(UK, US, New Zealand) An undergarment or swimwear consisting of very narrow strips designed to cover just the genitals and nothing more.

No! I won't buy you a thong. You're too young for that.

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Origin of thong

  • Middle English from Old English thwong

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English thong, thwong, thwang, from Old English þwong, þwang, þweng, þwæng (“thong, band, strap, cord, strip of leather; phylactery"), from Proto-Germanic *þwangiz, *þwanguz (“coercion, constraint, band, clamp, strap"), from Proto-Indo-European *twenk- (“to squeeze, press, pressure"). Cognate with Scots thwang, thwayng, thang (“thong"), Middle Low German dwenge (“clamp, jaws, steel-trap"), German Zwinge (“vise, clamp"), Norwegian dialectal tveng (“shoestrap, shoelace"), Icelandic þvengur (“strap, thong, latchet").

    From Wiktionary