Bias meaning

bī'əs
Bias is a tendency to mentally lean in a certain direction.

An example of bias is a democrat preferring "leftist" ideals.

noun
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A bias is defined as a line sewn or cut diagonally across fabric.

An example of bias is cutting a skirt on the diagonal so that it flows freely when worn.

noun
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A line, cut or sewn diagonally across the weave of cloth, as in making seams, binding tape, etc.
noun
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To apply a small voltage to (a grid).
verb
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A high-frequency signal or tone added to a tape during the recording process so as to reduce distortion and increase frequency response.
noun
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Slanting or diagonal; oblique.

A bias fold.

adjective
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To influence in a particular, typically unfair direction.
verb
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In lawn bowling,
  • The bulge in the side of the ball (the bowl) that causes it to roll in a curve.
  • This curve or tendency to curve.
  • The force causing this.
noun
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The fixed voltage applied to an electrode circuit to control the mode of operation, usually measured with the cathode voltage as reference.
noun
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Any systematic error contributing to the difference between statistical values in a population and a sample drawn from it.
noun
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Slanting; diagonal.
adjective
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Diagonally.
adverb
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Awry.
adverb
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To cause to have a bias; influence; prejudice.
verb
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To apply a bias to (an electrode)
verb
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A voltage applied to the gate (or base) of a transistor or vacuum tube, which causes the device to operate in its conductive state. When the control voltage (input voltage) is applied to the gate, it is added to the bias, causing the resultant voltage to be higher or lower, based on the sum of the two.Forward and Reverse BiasForward bias is a voltage that brings the transistor or tube into or closer to its conductive state. For example, if the gate requires positive voltage to conduct, forward biasing adds positive voltage.In contrast, reverse bias holds the device in a non-conductive state until the sum of the control voltage and bias is sufficient to bring it to the conductive state. For example, if the gate requires positive voltage to conduct, reverse biasing adds negative voltage.Bias is widely used in analog devices, such as an audio amplifier, to keep the input voltage constantly within the conductive region of the transistor or tube. It is also used in digital circuits to reach a certain threshold and open or close the switch faster.
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A mental tendency, inclination, preconception, prejudice, taint.
noun
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(countable, uncountable) Inclination towards something; predisposition, partiality, prejudice, preference, predilection.
noun
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(countable, textiles) The diagonal line between warp and weft in a woven fabric.
noun
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(countable, textiles) A wedge-shaped piece of cloth taken out of a garment (such as the waist of a dress) to diminish its circumference.
noun
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(electronics) A voltage or current applied for example to a transistor electrode.
noun
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(statistics) The difference between the expectation of the sample estimator and the true population value, which reduces the representativeness of the estimator by systematically distorting it.
noun
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(sports) In the game of crown green bowls: a weight added to one side of a bowl so that as it rolls, it will follow a curved rather than a straight path; the oblique line followed by such a bowl; the lopsided shape or structure of such a bowl.
noun
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To place bias upon; to influence.

Our prejudices bias our views.

verb
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Inclined to one side; swelled on one side.

adjective
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Cut slanting or diagonally, as cloth.
adjective
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In a slanting manner; crosswise; obliquely; diagonally.

To cut cloth bias.

adverb
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One of the Seven Sages of Greece from Priene living in the 6th century BC.
pronoun
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The definition of bias is something that is diagonal or slanting.

An example of bias is a fold in a fabric dinner napkin.

adjective
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A line going diagonally across the grain of fabric.

Cut the cloth on the bias.

noun
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A statistical sampling or testing error caused by systematically favoring some outcomes over others.
noun
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The fixed voltage applied to an electrode.
noun
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A mental leaning or inclination; partiality; bent.
noun
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on the bias
  • Diagonally; obliquely; specif., cut or sewn diagonally across the weave.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of bias

  • French biais slant from Provençal perhaps ultimately from Greek epikarsios slanted sker-1 in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle French biasis, from Old Provençal biais (“way, angle, slant”).
    From Wiktionary
  • From Ancient Greek Βίας (Bias).
    From Wiktionary