Paradigm meaning

părə-dīm, -dĭm
Frequency:
A set of assumptions, concepts, values, and practices that constitutes a way of viewing reality for the community that shares them, especially in an intellectual discipline.
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A system of assumptions, concepts, values, and practices that constitutes a way of viewing reality.
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The definition of a paradigm is a widely accepted example, belief or concept.

An example of paradigm is evolution.

An example of paradigm is the earth being round.

noun
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One that serves as a pattern or model.
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A conceptual framework"”an established thought process.
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A philosophy consisting of "˜top-bottom' ideas (namely biases which could possibly make the practitioner susceptible to the "˜confirmation bias').
noun
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Pronounced "pah-ruh-dime." A model, example or pattern. See paradigm shift and metaphor.
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A set or list of all the inflectional forms of a word or of one of its grammatical categories.

The paradigm of an irregular verb.

noun
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A way of thinking which can occasionally lead to misleading predispositions; a prejudice. A route of mental efficiency which has presumably been verified by affirmative results/predictions.
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(gram.) An example of a declension or conjugation, giving all the inflectional forms of a word.
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An example serving as a model or pattern; a template.
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(linguistics) A set of all forms which contain a common element, especially the set of all inflectional forms of a word or a particular grammatical category.

The paradigm of "go" is "go, went, gone."

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Origin of paradigm

  • Middle English example from Late Latin paradīgma from Greek paradeigma from paradeiknunai to compare para- alongside para–1 deiknunai to show deik- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Established 1475-85 from Late Latin paradÄ«gma, from Ancient Greek παράδειγμα (paradeigma, “pattern").

    From Wiktionary