Standard meaning

stăndərd
Frequency:
The definition of a standard is something established as a rule, example or basis of comparison.

An example of standard is a guideline governing what students must learn in the 7th grade.

An example of standard is a piece of music that continues to be played throughout the years.

noun
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Serving as or conforming to an established or accepted measurement or value.

A standard unit of volume.

adjective
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Normal, familiar, or usual.

The standard excuse.

adjective
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Widely recognized or employed as a model of authority or excellence.

A standard reference work.

adjective
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Acceptable but of less than top quality.

A standard grade of beef.

adjective
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Commonly used or supplied.

Standard car equipment.

adjective
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2
(linguistics) Conforming to models or norms of usage admired by educated speakers and writers.

Standard pronunciation.

adjective
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The large upper petal of the flower of a pea or related plant.
noun
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A principle or example or measure used for comparison.
noun
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One of the narrow upright petals of an iris.
noun
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A rule, principle, or measure established as a model or example by authority, custom, or general consent. Standards generally are in the form of baseline specifications according to which manufacturers can develop products with the assurance that they will interconnect and interoperate with those of other manufacturers, at least at a fundamental level. Standards typically allow for options that manufacturers can exercise in various fashions peculiar to their own product development philosophies, strategies, and so on, thereby distinguishing those products from others.Although standards have been criticized as common denominator or consensus solutions that stifle creativity, they in fact provide a common framework of technical specifications within which manufacturers can exercise a considerable level of creativity. Standards serve to create the technical basis for a competitive market that offers buyers a choice of products, while ensuring interconnectivity and interoperability at a fundamental level. Standards take several forms.
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The type, model, or example commonly or generally accepted or adhered to; criterion set for usages or practices.

Moral standards.

noun
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Designating or of an automotive transmission that is manual.
adjective
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A shrub or small tree that through grafting or training has a single stem of limited height with a crown of leaves and flowers at its apex.
noun
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Something established for use as a rule or basis of comparison in measuring or judging capacity, quantity, content, extent, value, quality, etc.

Standards of weight and measure.

noun
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(shipbuilding) An inverted knee timber placed upon the deck instead of beneath it, with its vertical branch turned upward from that which lies horizontally.
noun
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(not comparable, of a motor vehicle) Having a manual transmission.
adjective
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(chiefly british) A grade level in elementary schools.
noun
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A pedestal, stand, or base.
noun
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(music) A composition that is continually used in repertoires.

A pianist who knew dozens of Broadway standards.

noun
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Any figure or object, esp. a flag or banner, used as an emblem or symbol of a leader, people, military unit, etc.
  • (heraldry) A long, tapering flag used as an ensign, as by a king.
  • (mil.) The colors of a cavalry unit.
noun
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A level of excellence, attainment, etc. regarded as a measure of adequacy.
noun
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Any upright object used as a support, often a part of the thing it supports; supporting piece; base; stand.
noun
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A piece of popular music that continues to be included in the repertoire of many bands, singers, etc. through the years.
noun
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Used as, or meeting the requirements of, a standard, rule, model, etc.
adjective
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Generally accepted as reliable or authoritative.

Standard reference books.

adjective
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Conforming to what is usual; ordinary; not special or extra.

Standard procedure.

adjective
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A specification for hardware or software that is either widely used and accepted (de facto) or is sanctioned by a standards organization (de jure). See standards.
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A vertical pole with something at its apex.
noun
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A manual transmission vehicle.
noun
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A flag, banner, or ensign, especially:
  • The ensign of a chief of state, nation, or city.
  • A long, tapering flag bearing heraldic devices distinctive of a person or corporation.
  • An emblem or flag of an army, raised on a pole to indicate the rallying point in battle.
  • The colors of a mounted or motorized military unit.
noun
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(botany) The upper petal or banner of a papilionaceous corolla.
noun
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A large drinking cup.

noun
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Falling within an accepted range of size, amount, power, quality, etc.
adjective
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(of a tree or shrub) Growing on an erect stem of full height.
adjective
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adjective
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Of a usable or serviceable grade or quality.
adjective
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As normally supplied (not optional).
adjective
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Standard means usual or common.

An example of standard is the common greeting in a particular culture.

adjective
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Origin of standard

  • Middle English flag, banner, standard measure (perhaps from the use of flags as points of reference in battle) from Old French estandard flag marking a rallying place from Frankish standhard probably originally meaning standing firmly, steadfast standan to stand stā- in Indo-European roots hard firm, hard kar- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English, from the Old French estandart (“gathering place, battle flag"), from Old Frankish *standhard (literally “stand firm, stand hard"), equivalent to stand +"Ž -ard. Alternate etymology derives the second element from Old Frankish *ord (“point, spot, place") (compare Old English ord (“point, source, vanguard"), German Standort (“location, place, site, position, base", literally “standing-point")). More at stand, hard, ord.From Old French estendre (“to stretch out"), from Latin extendere, More at extend.

    From Wiktionary