Banner meaning

bănər
Frequency:
A flag.

The Star-Spangled Banner.

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A piece of cloth bearing a motto or legend, as of a club.
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Unusually good; outstanding.

A banner year for the company.

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A headline spanning the width of a newspaper page.
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To supply with banners.
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To give a banner headline to (a story or item) in a newspaper.
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A piece of cloth bearing a design, motto, slogan, etc., sometimes attached to a staff and used as a battle standard.
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A headline extending across a newspaper page.
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A long strip of cloth with an advertisement, greeting, etc. lettered on it.
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An advertisement appearing on a webpage and typically containing a hyperlink to the advertiser's website.
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Foremost; leading; outstanding.

A banner year in sales.

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To publish or proclaim with or as with a banner headline.
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Many text-based protocols (FTP, SSH, Telnet, SMTP, finger, HTTP, POP3, identd/auth, and UUCP) issue text banners when users connect to the service, and the information displayed in the banner can be used to fingerprint the service. Because many banners reveal exact versions of the product, crackers can find exploits to use if they invest time looking. Crackers can look up the listed version numbers to discover which exploit works on a particular system. For example, the telnet server shipped with the 2.0.31 Linux kernel is known to be vulnerable to exploits. Here is how a cracker can be tipped off about the vulnerability for Telnet. The banner for the protocol would read as follows (note the line which reads “Kernel 2.0.31 on an i586”): For this reason, many security experts recommend—and, in fact, doing so is required in some jurisdictions—displaying a banner “warning off” all unauthorized users. This warning also serves the purpose of avoiding a limitation imposed on system administrators through the U.S. Federal Wiretap Act. Communication on a network may not be monitored by anybody if the initiator can claim a reasonable expectation of privacy. System administrators therefore set up the banners for their services to state that access to their services will be monitored. Moreover, it is recommended to system administrators that all version information be suppressed in the banners. Some system administrators alter banners to purposely disinform an attacker so as to put an attacker on a wild goose chase. A perfect example is making Microsoft’s IIS Web server advertise itself as something else, such as a checkpoint server on a Solaris UNIX machine. Graham, R. Hacking Lexicon. [Online, 2001.] Robert Graham Website. http://www.linuxsecurity.com/resource_files/documentation/hacking-dict.html.
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A flag or standard used by a military commander, monarch or nation.
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Any large sign, especially if constructed of soft material or fabric.

The mayor hung a banner across Main Street to commemorate the town's 100th anniversary.

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A large piece of silk or other cloth, with a device or motto, extended on a crosspiece, and borne in a procession, or suspended in some conspicuous place.
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By extension, a cause or purpose; a campaign or movement.

They usually make their case under the banner of environmentalism.

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(journalism) The title of a newspaper as printed on its front page; the nameplate; masthead.
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(Internet, television) A type of advertisement in a web page or on television, usually taking the form of a graphic or animation above or alongside the content. Contrast popup, interstitial.
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(heraldry) The principal standard of a knight.
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A person etc. who bans something.
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An administrative subdivision in Inner Mongolia.
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It is a banner achievement for an athlete to run a mile in under four minutes.

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The definition of a banner is a sign or a flag.

An example of a banner is a cloth sign bearing a city's motto hung on the front of city hall.

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Origin of banner

  • Middle English banere from Old French baniere from Vulgar Latin bandāria from Late Latin bandum of Germanic origin bhā-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Old French baniere (Modern bannière) of Germanic origin. More at band.

    From Wiktionary