Quality meaning

kwŏlĭ-tē
Frequency:
Investments that have a low risk of loss or default.

The flight to quality.

noun
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19
(now rare) Position, capacity, or role.
noun
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16
(phonet.) The distinctive character of a vowel sound as determined by the resonance of the vocal cords and the shape of the air passage above the larynx when the sound is produced.
noun
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18
Excellence; superiority.
noun
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3
Basic nature; character; kind.
noun
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5
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Essential character; nature.
noun
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4
The degree of excellence which a thing possesses.
noun
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6
Any of the features that make something what it is; characteristic element; attribute.
noun
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4
The perceived value in something. It implies excellence in a product. The IEEE defines quality as the degree to which something meets the customer's needs or expectations. See QA and software quality assurance.
4
4
(linguistics) The character of a vowel sound determined by the size and shape of the oral cavity and the amount of resonance with which the sound is produced.
noun
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6
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Having a high degree of excellence.

The importance of quality health care.

adjective
3
2
(logic) That characteristic of a proposition according to which it is classified as affirmative or negative.
noun
3
6
(music) Timbre, as determined by harmonics.

A voice with a distinctive metallic quality.

noun
2
4
Of high quality.

Quality goods.

adjective
2
4
(logic) The positive or negative character of a proposition.
noun
2
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(acoustics) The property of a tone determined by its overtones; timbre.
noun
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5
The definition of a quality is a distinctive characteristic or trait.

An example of quality is kindness.

noun
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Quality is a judgment of how excellent something or someone is.

An example of quality is a product that won't break easily.

An example of quality is a well-made product.

noun
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(uncountable) Level of excellence.

This school is well-known for having teachers of high quality.

Quality of life is usually determined by health, education, and income.

noun
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(countable) A property or an attribute that differentiates a thing or person.

One of the qualities of pure iron is that it does not rust easily.

While being impulsive can be great for artists, it is not a desirable quality for engineers.

Security, stability, and efficiency are good qualities of an operating system.

noun
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(archaic) High social position. (See also the quality.)

A peasant is not allowed to fall in love with a lady of quality.

Membership of this golf club is limited to those of quality and wealth.

noun
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(uncountable) The degree to which a man-made object or system is free from bugs and flaws, as opposed to scope of functions or quantity of items.
noun
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(thermodynamics) In a two-phase liquid-vapor mixture, the ratio of the mass of vapor present to the total mass of the mixture.
noun
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(emergency medicine, countable) The third step in OPQRST where the responder investigates what the NOI/MOI feels like.

To identify quality try asking, "what does it feel like?".

noun
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Being of good worth, well made, fit for purpose.

We only sell quality products.

That was a quality game by Jim Smith.

A quality system ensures products meet customer requirements.

adjective
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Archaic spelling of equality.
noun
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Origin of quality

  • Middle English qualite from Old French from Latin quālitās quālitāt- from quālis of what kind kwo- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English, from Old French qualité, from Latin qualitatem, accusative of qualitas, from qualis (“of what kind"), from Proto-Indo-European *kÊ·o- (“who, how"). Cicero coined qualitas as a calque to translate the Ancient Greek word ποιότης (poiótes, “quality"), coined by Plato from ποῖος (poios, “of what nature, of what kind").

    From Wiktionary

  • æqual +‎ -ity

    From Wiktionary