Great meaning

grāt
One that is great.

A composer considered among the greats.

noun
15
9
Being one generation removed from the relative specified. Often used in combination.

A great-granddaughter.

adjective
3
5
(archaic) Pregnant.
adjective
3
7
Of much more than ordinary size, extent, volume, etc.
  • Designating a thing or group of things larger than others of the same kind.
    The great cats are tigers, lions, etc.; the Great Lakes.
  • Large in number, quantity, etc.; numerous.
    A great company.
  • Long in duration.
    A great while.
adjective
2
0
Of most importance; main; chief.

The great seal.

adjective
1
2
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(informal) Clever; expert; skillful.

Great at tennis.

adjective
1
2
The definition of great is very much above the ordinary quality or size.

An example of great is scoring 90 on a test.

An example of great is the dimensions of an elephant.

adjective
0
0
Very big, large scale.

A great storm is approaching our shores.

adjective
0
0
Very good.

Dinner was great.

adjective
0
0
adjective
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0
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Title referring to an important leader.

Alexander the Great.

adjective
0
0
Superior; admirable; commanding; applied to thoughts, actions, and feelings.

A great nature.

adjective
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0
Endowed with extraordinary powers; uncommonly gifted; able to accomplish vast results; strong; powerful; mighty; noble.

A great hero, scholar, genius, philosopher, etc.

adjective
0
0
More than ordinary in degree; very considerable.

To use great caution; to be in great pain.

adjective
0
0
Expression of gladness and content about something.

Great! Thanks for the wonderful work.

interjection
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0
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Sarcastic inversion thereof.

Oh, great! I just dumped all 500 sheets of the manuscript all over and now I have to put them back in order.

interjection
0
0
A person of major significance, accomplishment or acclaim.

Newton and Einstein are two of the greats of the history of science.

noun
0
0
(typographically plural, grammatically singular proper noun) A course of academic study devoted to the works of such persons and also known as Literae Humaniores; the "Greats" name has official status with respect to Oxford University's program and is widely used as a colloquialism in reference to similar programs elsewhere.

Spencer read Greats at Oxford, taking a starred first.

noun
0
0
(music) The main division in a pipe organ, usually the loudest division.
noun
0
0
Very well (in a very satisfactory manner)

Those mechanical colored pencils work great because they don't have to be sharpened.

adverb
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0
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With familial designations, used to denote a removal of one generation.

Great-uncle (an uncle of one's mother or father)

Great-grandfather (the father of one's grandfather)

Great-great-grandfather (a grandfather of one's grandfather)

Great-great-great-grandfather, etc.

(informal) Fourth-great-uncle, etc. (same as great-great-great-great-uncle.

(informal) Fourth-great-grandfather, etc. (same as great-great-great-great-grandfather.

prefix
0
0
Very well.

Got along great with the teacher.

adverb
0
1
Used as an intensive with certain adjectives.

A great big kiss.

adverb
0
1
Much higher in some quality or degree; much above the ordinary or average.
  • Existing in a high degree; intense.
    A great light, great pain.
  • Very much of a; acting much as (something specified)
    A great reader.
  • Eminent; distinguished; illustrious; superior.
    A great playwright.
  • Very impressive or imposing; remarkable.
    great ceremony.
  • Having or showing nobility of mind, purpose, etc.; grand.
    A great man, great ideas.
adjective
0
1
(informal) Excellent; splendid; fine.
adjective
0
1
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(now chiefly dial.) Pregnant.
adjective
0
1
(informal) Very well.
adverb
0
1
A great or distinguished person.
noun
0
1
Older (or younger) by one generation.

Great-aunt, great-great-grandson.

affix
0
1
great on
  • enthusiastic about
idiom
0
0
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the great
  • those who are great
idiom
0
0

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
great
Plural:
greats

Adjective

Base Form:
great
Comparative:
greater
Superlative:
greatest

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

great on
the great

Origin of great

  • Middle English grete from Old English grēat thick, coarse

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English greet (“great, large”), from Old English grēat (“big, thick, coarse, stour, massive”), from Proto-Germanic *grautaz (“big in size, coarse, coarse grained”), from Proto-Indo-European *ghrewə- (“to fell, put down, fall in”). Cognate with Scots great (“coarse in grain or texture, thick, great”), West Frisian grut (“large, great”), Dutch groot (“large, stour”), German groß (“large”), Old English grēot (“earth, sand, grit”), Latin grandis (“great,big”), Albanian ngre (“I lift, heave, stand, elevate”). More at grit.

    From Wiktionary