Weak definitions

wēk
Lacking in skill or strength in combat or competition.

A weak team.

adjective
128
3
Lacking the usual or proper strength.
  • Having only a small amount of its essential ingredient; diluted.
    weak tea.
  • Not as potent as usual or as others of the kind.
    A weak drug.
  • Lacking, poor, or deficient in something specified.
    weak in grammar, a baseball team weak in pitching.
  • Slight; indistinct; not prominent.
    A weak chin.
adjective
124
1
Tending toward lower prices.
adjective
121
2
Having a low ion concentration.
adjective
118
2
Expressing variation in tense by the addition of an inflectional suffix rather than by internal change of a syllabic vowel; regular (Ex.: talk, talked, talked)
adjective
115
1
Unstressed or lightly stressed.
adjective
112
2
adjective
109
0
Designating or of a verse ending in which the stress falls on a word or syllable that is normally unstressed.
adjective
106
3
Lacking in moral strength or willpower; yielding easily to temptation, the influence of others, etc.
adjective
103
1
Lacking in mental power, or in the ability to think, judge, decide, etc.
adjective
100
2
Lacking in force or effectiveness.

Weak discipline.

adjective
97
1
Indicating or suggesting moral or physical lack of strength.

Weak features.

adjective
94
1
Lacking in volume, intensity, etc.; faint.

A weak voice, a weak current.

adjective
91
2
Lacking physical strength, energy, or vigor; feeble.
adjective
74
1
Likely to fail under pressure, stress, or strain; lacking resistance.

A weak link in a chain.

adjective
71
1
Designating a verse ending in which the metrical stress falls on a word or syllable that is unstressed in normal speech, such as a preposition.
adjective
68
0
Lacking firmness of character or strength of will.

A weak person unable to cope with adversity.

adjective
65
1
Lacking persuasiveness; unconvincing.

A weak argument.

adjective
62
1
Lacking authority or the power to govern.

A weak ruler.

adjective
59
2
Unstressed or unaccented in pronunciation or poetic meter. Used of a word or syllable.
adjective
56
1
Lacking in force (usually strength) or ability.

The child was too weak to move the boulder.

They easily guessed his weak computer password.

adjective
10
0
(stock exchange) Tending towards lower prices.

A weak market.

adjective
10
0
Unable to sustain a great weight, pressure, or strain.

A weak timber; a weak rope.

adjective
7
0
Unable to withstand temptation, urgency, persuasion, etc.; easily impressed, moved, or overcome; accessible; vulnerable.

Weak resolutions; weak virtue.

adjective
7
0
The definition of weak is lacking in strength.

An example of weak used as an adjective is a weak argument which means an argument that has no evidence to back it up.

adjective
6
0
Dilute, lacking in taste or potency.

We were served stale bread and weak tea.

adjective
4
0
Lacking in vigour or expression.

A weak sentence; a weak style.

adjective
4
0
(grammar) Displaying a particular kind of inflection, including:
  • (Germanic languages, of verbs) Regular in inflection, lacking vowel changes and having a past tense with -d- or -t-.
  • (Germanic languages, of nouns) Showing less distinct grammatical endings.
  • (Germanic languages, of adjectives) Definite in meaning, often used with a definite article or similar word.
adjective
1
0
Not prevalent or effective, or not felt to be prevalent; not potent; feeble.
adjective
1
0
(physics) One of the four fundamental forces associated with nuclear decay.
adjective
0
0
(slang) Bad or uncool.

This place is weak.

adjective
0
0
(mathematics, logic) Having a narrow range of logical consequences; narrowly applicable. (Often contrasted with a strong statement which implies it.)
adjective
0
0
Resulting from, or indicating, lack of judgment, discernment, or firmness; unwise; hence, foolish.
adjective
0
0
Not having power to convince; not supported by force of reason or truth; unsustained.

The prosecution advanced a weak case.

adjective
0
0

Origin of weak

From Middle English weike, from Old Norse veikr (“weak"), cognate with Old English wÄ«can (“to yield"). Proto-Indo-European base *weik- (“to bend, wind"). Replaced the native Old English wāc. Compare German weich, Dutch week.