Week definitions

wēk
The definition of a week is a seven-day period of time usually considered to extend from Sunday to Saturday, or a five or seven-day period devoted to some specific purpose, such as working.

The seven days on a line of a calendar that include Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday are an example of a calendar week.

The five days Monday through Friday that you spend going to work instead of being off is an example of a work week or business week.

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The part of a calendar week devoted to work, school, or business.

Working a three-day week.

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A period of seven days.

A week of rain.

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A seven-day calendar period, especially one starting with Sunday and continuing through Saturday.

This week.

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A week designated by an event or holiday occurring within it.

Commencement week.

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A week dedicated to a particular cause or institution.

Home Safety Week.

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One week from a specified day.

I'll see you Friday week.

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One week ago from a specified day.

It was Friday week that we last met.

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A period of seven days, esp. one beginning with Sunday and ending with Saturday.
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A particular or specified week.

Easter week, freshman week.

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The hours or days of work in a seven-day period.

To work a 40-hour week.

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Any period of seven consecutive days.
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A period of seven days beginning with Sunday or Monday.
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A subdivision of the month into longer periods of work days punctuated by shorter weekend periods of days for markets, rest, or religious observation such as a sabbath.
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Seven days after (sometimes before) a specified date.

I'll see you Thursday week.

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Origin of week

From Middle English weke, from Old English wice, wucu (“week"), from Proto-Germanic *wikÇ­ (“turn, succession, change, week"), from Proto-Indo-European *weig-, *weik- (“to bend, wind, turn, yield"). Related to Proto-Germanic *wÄ«kanÄ… (“to bend, yield, cease"). The Dutch noun derives from a related verb *waikwaz (“to yield"), via the current Dutch form wijken (“to cede, give way").