Octave definition

ŏktĭv, -tāv
Frequency:
(music) Producing tones an octave higher.

An octave key.

adjective
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A group of eight lines of verse; specif., the first eight lines of a Petrarchan sonnet.
noun
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Any group of eight.
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The eighth day following a church festival, counting the festival day as the first.
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A group or series of eight.
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The entire period between the festival and this day.
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The definition of an octave is a progression of eight notes on a musical scale, or the notes at the beginning and end of the progression.

Two musical notes which are eight tones apart on a scale are an example of an octave.

noun
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(sports) A rotating parry in fencing.
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A poem or stanza containing eight lines.
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(fencing) A position of thrust or parry in which the hand is rotated with the palm up.
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The eighth tone of an ascending or descending diatonic scale, or a tone seven degrees above or below a given tone in such a scale.
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The interval of seven diatonic degrees between a tone and either of its octaves.
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The series of tones contained within this interval, or the keys of an instrument producing such a series.
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A tone and either of its octaves sounded together.
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An organ stop producing tones an octave above those ordinarily produced by the keys struck.
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Consisting of eight, or an octave.
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(music) An interval of twelve semitones spanning eight degrees of the diatonic scale, representing a doubling or halving in pitch.

The melody jumps up an octave at the beginning, then later drops back down an octave.

The singer was known for astounding clarity over her entire five-octave range.

The octave has a pitch ratio of 2:1.

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(music) The pitch an octave higher than a given pitch.

The bass starts on a low E, and the tenor comes in on the octave.

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(poetry) A poetic stanza consisting of eight lines; usually used as one part of a sonnet.
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(fencing) The eighth defensive position, with the sword hand held at waist height, and the tip of the sword out straight at knee level.
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(Christianity) The day that is one week after a feast day in the Latin Rite of the Catholic Church.
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(Christianity) An eight day period beginning on a feast day in the Latin Rite of the Catholic Church.
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A small cask of wine, one eighth of a pipe.
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(obsolete) Consisting of eight; eight in number.

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The interval of eight diatonic degrees between two tones of the same name, the higher of which has twice as many vibrations per second as the lower.
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A tone that is eight diatonic degrees above or below another given tone.
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Two tones eight diatonic degrees apart that are sounded together.
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The consonance that results when two tones eight diatonic degrees apart are sounded.
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A series of tones included within this interval or the keys of an instrument that produce such a series.
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An organ stop that produces tones an octave above those usually produced by the keys played.
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The interval between any two frequencies having a ratio of 2 to 1.
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The eighth day after a feast day, counting the feast day as one.
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The entire period between a feast day and the eighth day following it.
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A group of eight lines of poetry, especially the first eight lines of a Petrarchan sonnet.
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
octave
Plural:
octaves

Origin of octave

  • Middle English eighth day after a feast day from Old French from Medieval Latin octāva (diēs) from Latin feminine of octāvus eighth from octō eight oktō(u) in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin octavus (“eighth").

    From Wiktionary