Modal meaning

mōd'l
The definition of modal is expressing a mood, particularly in personality or grammar, or the composition mode of medieval church music, or form as opposed to substance.

An example of something modal is a photo that expresses happiness; a modal photography.

An example of something modal is a song composed during medieval times; a modal tune.

An example of something modal is a poem focused on the structure of the poem instead of the content; a modal poem.

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Of, relating to, or characteristic of a mode.
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Of, relating to, or expressing the mood of a verb.
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Of, relating to, characteristic of, or composed in any of the modes typical of medieval church music.
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Of or relating to mode without referring to substance.
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Expressing or characterized by modality.
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Of or relating to a statistical mode or modes.
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Of or indicating a mode or mood.
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Of or expressing mood.

A modal auxiliary.

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Expressing or characterized by modality.
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Of or composed in any of the medieval church modes.
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Of mode, or form, as opposed to substance.
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Having to do with a statistical mode.
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Mode-oriented. A modal operation switches from one mode to another. Contrast with non-modal.
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Of, or relating to a mode or modus.
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(grammar) Of, relating to, or describing the mood of a clause.
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(grammar) Modal verb.
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(music) Of, relating to, or composed in the musical modi by which an octave is divided, associated with emotional moods in Ancient "” and in medieval ecclesiastical music.
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(logic) Of, or relating to the modality between propositions.
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(statistics) Relating to the statistical mode.
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(computing) Having separate modes in which user input has different effects.
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(computer science) Requiring immediate user interaction (often used as modal dialog or modal window)
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(metaphysics) Relating to the form of a thing rather to any of its attributes.
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(logic) A modal proposition.
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(linguistics) A modal form, notably a modal auxiliary.
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Origin of modal

  • Medieval Latin modālis from Latin modus measure med- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Medieval Latin modalis (“pertaining to a mode"), from Latin modus (“mode"); see mode. Compare to French, Spanish and Portuguese modal and Italian modale.
    From Wiktionary