Impressionism meaning

ĭm-prĕsh'ə-nĭz'əm
A theory or style of painting originating and developed in France during the 1870s, characterized by concentration on the immediate visual impression produced by a scene and by the use of unmixed primary colors and small strokes to simulate actual reflected light.
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A literary style characterized by the use of details and mental associations to evoke subjective and sensory impressions rather than the re-creation of objective reality.
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A style of art music of the late 1800s and early 1900s, often evoking a dreamy mood and characterized by modal or whole-tone scales, rich and often dissonant harmonies in unconventional progressions, and the avoidance of traditional forms.
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A theory and school of painting exemplified chiefly by Monet, Pissarro, and Sisley, but also by Manet, Renoir, etc., whose chief aim is to capture a momentary glimpse of a subject, esp. to reproduce the changing effects of light by applying paint to canvas in short strokes of pure color.
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(art) A movement in art characterized by visible brush strokes, ordinary subject matters, and an emphasis on light and its changing qualities.
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(music) A style that avoided traditional harmony, and sought to invoke the impressions of the composer.
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(poetry) A style that used imagery and symbolism to portray the poet's impressions.
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Origin of impressionism

  • From French impressionnisme
    From Wiktionary