Infirm meaning

ĭn-fûrm'
The definition of infirm is being sickly or weak, or not strong in will or character.

An old and sickly person is an example of someone who is infirm.

When you cannot make or stick to a decision and are weak-willed, this is an example of being infirm.

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Not stable, firm, or sound; frail; shaky, as a structure.
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Weak in body or mind, especially from old age or disease.
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Not strong or stable; shaky.

An infirm foundation.

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Lacking firmness of will, character, or purpose; irresolute.
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Not firm or strong physically; weak; feeble, as from old age.
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Not firm in mind or purpose; not resolute; vacillating.
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Not secure or valid.

An infirm title to property.

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Weak in body or mind, especially from old age or disease.
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Weak or ill, not in good health.

He was infirm of body but still keen of mind, and though it looked like he couldn't walk across the room, he crushed me in debate.

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Irresolute; weak of mind or will.
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To contradict, to provide proof that something is not.

The thought is that you see an episode of observation, experiment, or reasoning as confirming or infirming a hypothesis depending on whether your probability for it increases or decreases during the episode.

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Origin of infirm

  • Middle English infirme from Old French from Latin īnfirmus in- not in–1 firmus strong, firm dher- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Borrowing from Latin infirmus.
    From Wiktionary