Sap meaning

săp
(slang) A foolish or gullible person.
noun
4
1
To sap is to weaken someone or to destroy their spirit, energy or power, especially when done slowly over time.

An example of sap is a teen who is rebellious and continually drains the energy of her parents.

verb
3
0
A blackjack, short club, etc.
noun
3
1
Sap is sugary water that is found in the vascular system of some plants or a gullible person who can easily be tricked.

An example of sap is what is collected from a maple tree to make maple syrup.

An example of sap is a person who falls for a trick.

noun
1
0
Health and energy; vitality.

The constant bickering drained his sap away.

noun
0
0
Advertisement
To drain (a tree, for example) of sap.
verb
0
0
To deplete or weaken gradually.

The noisy children sapped all my energy. The flu sapped him of his strength.

verb
0
0
A covered trench or tunnel dug to a point near or within an enemy position.
noun
0
0
To undermine the foundations of (a fortification).
verb
0
0
To dig a sap.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
A leather-covered bludgeon with a short, flexible shaft or strap, used as a hand weapon.
noun
0
0
To hit or knock out with a sap.
verb
0
0
The juice that circulates through a plant, esp. a woody plant, bearing water, food, etc. to the tissues.
noun
0
0
Any fluid vital to the life or health of an organism.
noun
0
0
Vigor; vitality.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
(slang) A stupid person; fool.
noun
0
0
To drain of sap.
verb
0
0
An extended, narrow trench for approaching or undermining an enemy position or fortification.
noun
0
0
To undermine by digging away foundations; dig beneath.
verb
0
0
To undermine in any way; weaken; exhaust.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
To dig saps.
verb
0
0
To approach an enemy's position by saps.
verb
0
0
To hit on the head, or knock out, with a sap.
verb
0
0
The watery fluid that circulates through a plant that has vascular tissues. Sap moving up the xylem carries water and minerals, while sap moving down the phloem carries water and food.
0
0
(1) (SAP America, Inc., Newtown Square, PA, www.sap.com) The U.S. branch of one of the world's largest software companies, SAP AG, Walldorf, Germany. SAP was founded in 1972 as Systems, Applications and Products in Data Processing by five former engineers from IBM. SAP's R/2 mainframe and R/3 client/server business application suites were the flagship products for the company, catapulting the company into prominence in the 1980s and 1990s. Today, under the banner of the SAP Business Suite, SAP is a leading vendor in enterprise resource planning (ERP) and other enterprise business software.In 2010, SAP acquired Sybase, maker of the popular Sybase database and related software. See SAP Business Suite, R/3 and Sybase.
0
0
Advertisement
(uncountable) The juice of plants of any kind, especially the ascending and descending juices or circulating fluid essential to nutrition.
noun
0
0
(uncountable) The sap-wood, or alburnum, of a tree.
noun
0
0
(slang, countable) A simpleton; a saphead; a milksop; a naive person.
noun
0
0
(countable, US, slang) A short wooden club; a leather-covered hand weapon; a blackjack.
noun
0
0
(slang) To strike with a sap (with a blackjack).
verb
0
0
Advertisement
(military) A narrow ditch or trench made from the foremost parallel toward the glacis or covert way of a besieged place by digging under cover of gabions, etc.
noun
0
0
To subvert by digging or wearing away; to mine; to undermine; to destroy the foundation of.
verb
0
0
(military) To pierce with saps.
verb
0
0
To make unstable or infirm; to unsettle; to weaken.
verb
0
0
To gradually weaken.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
(intransitive) To proceed by mining, or by secretly undermining; to execute saps "” 12
verb
0
0

Origin of sap

  • French sape from saper to sap, undermine from Italian zappare to dig with a mattock or hoe, sap from zappa mattock, hoe from Old Italian from Late Latin sappa of unknown origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English sæp V., sense 2, probably partly from sap (taken as “to weaken (resistance) as by draining of sap.”)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Probably short for sapling since the bludgeons were made from wood from saplings

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old English sæp, from Proto-Germanic *sapōn (cf. East Frisian/Dutch sap, German Saft, Icelandic safi), from Proto-Indo-European *sab-, Proto-Indo-European *sap- (cf. Welsh sybwydd 'fir', Latin sapa (“must, new wine"), Russian сопли (sópli, “snivel"), Armenian Õ°Õ¡Õ´ (ham, “juice, taste"), Avestan višāpa 'having poisonous juices'[script?], Sanskrit sabar 'juice, nectar'[Devanagari?]), from *sap 'to taste'. More at sage.

    From Wiktionary

  • From French saper (compare Spanish zapar and Italian zappare) from sape (“sort of scythe"), from Late Latin sappa (“sort of mattock").

    From Wiktionary

  • Probably from sapling.

    From Wiktionary