Fool definition

fo͝ol
One who is deficient in judgment, sense, or understanding.
noun
22
3
One who acts unwisely on a given occasion.

I was a fool to have quit my job.

noun
18
3
A member of a royal or noble household who provided entertainment, as with jokes or antics; a jester.
noun
12
1
One who subverts convention or orthodoxy or varies from social conformity in order to reveal spiritual or moral truth.

A holy fool.

noun
13
4
A dessert made of stewed or puréed fruit mixed with cream or custard and served cold.
noun
5
0
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To confound or prove wrong; surprise, especially pleasantly.

We were sure they would fail, but they fooled us.

verb
5
0
To engage in idle or frivolous activity.
verb
5
1
One who has been tricked or made to appear ridiculous; a dupe.

They made a fool of me by pretending I had won.

noun
4
0
Foolish; stupid.

Off on some fool errand or other.

adjective
4
0
A person with little or no judgment, common sense, wisdom, etc.; silly or stupid person; simpleton.
noun
4
0
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A man formerly kept in the household of a nobleman or king to entertain by joking and clowning; professional jester.
noun
3
0
A victim of a joke or trick; dupe.
noun
3
0
To act like a fool; be silly.
verb
3
0
The definition of a fool is someone with poor judgment.

An example of a fool is someone who constantly takes dangerous risks.

noun
2
0
(informal) A person with a talent or enthusiasm for a certain activity.

A dancing fool; a fool for skiing.

noun
2
0
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A person especially devoted to or skilled in some activity.

A dancing fool.

noun
2
0
(informal) Foolish.
adjective
2
0
(informal) To trifle or meddle (with)
verb
2
0
To make a fool of; trick; deceive; dupe.
verb
2
0
(pejorative) A person with poor judgment or little intelligence.

You were a fool to cross that busy road without looking.

The village fool threw his own shoes down the well.

noun
2
0
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To deceive or trick; dupe.
verb
3
2
To speak, act, etc. in jest; joke.
verb
2
1
To fool is defined as to trick or lie to.

An example of to fool is for a person to trick everyone into believing she is kind and generous when she is really a thief.

verb
1
0
To toy, tinker, or mess.

Shouldn't fool with matches.

verb
1
0
To speak or act facetiously or in jest; joke.

I was just fooling when I said I had to leave.

verb
1
0
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To behave comically; clown.
verb
1
0
To feign; pretend.

He said he had a toothache but he was only fooling.

verb
1
0
(brit.) Crushed stewed fruit mixed with cream, esp. whipped cream.
noun
1
0
(historical) A jester; a person whose role was to entertain a sovereign and the court (lower personages).
noun
1
0
(informal) Someone who derives pleasure from something specified.
noun
1
0
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(cooking) A type of dessert made of puréed fruit and custard or cream.

An apricot fool; a gooseberry fool.

noun
1
0
(often capitalized, Fool) A particular card in a tarot deck.
noun
1
0
To trick; to make a fool of someone.
verb
1
0
To play the fool; to trifle; to toy; to spend time in idle sport or mirth.
verb
1
0
(archaic) A mentally deficient person; an idiot.
noun
3
3
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(obs.) A mentally retarded person.
noun
1
1
play
  • To act in an irresponsible or foolish manner.
  • To behave in a playful or comical manner.
idiom
2
0
be no fool
  • to be shrewd and capable
idiom
2
0
(informal) fool around
  • to spend time in trifling or pointless activity
  • to trifle or meddle
  • to engage in casual sexual activity
idiom
1
0
fool away
  • to fritter away foolishly
idiom
2
0
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play the fool
  • to act like a fool; do silly things; clown
idiom
2
0

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
fool
Plural:
fools

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of fool

  • Middle English fol from Old French from Late Latin follis windbag, fool from Latin follis bellows bhel-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English fōl (“fool”), from Old French fol (French fou (“mad”)) from Latin follis.

    From Wiktionary