Doodle meaning

do͝od'l
Doodle is defined as to casually scribble or draw.

If you make circles with your pen aimlessly during a boring lecture, this is an example of when you doodle.

verb
3
1
(slang, sometimes childish) Penis.
noun
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1
The definition of a doodle is a casual or rough drawing made without much thought.

A little picture of a house you made on the back of a napkin without a lot of thought going into it is an example of a doodle.

noun
1
1
To draw or scribble (something) aimlessly.
verb
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2
A figure or design drawn or written absent-mindedly.
noun
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1
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To move aimlessly or foolishly; dawdle.
verb
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1
To scribble or draw aimlessly or nervously, esp. when the attention is elsewhere; make doodles.
verb
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1
To play music in a casual, informal way.
verb
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1
A mark, design, figure, etc. made in doodling.
noun
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1
1812, "THE TEARS OF SIR VICARY!!!", The Scourge, 2 March 1812, page 231.

Perceval. Weep on! weep on! thou flouted loon,

Weep on! weep on! thou gowky doodle!

noun
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1837, "Carmen Inaugurale", Tait's Edinburgh Magazine, November 1837, page 676.

Courtier, it was thine to bow —

Great Arthur he, and Doodle thou!

noun
0
1
A small mindless sketch, etc.
noun
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1
To draw or sketch aimlessly, especially when preoccupied.
verb
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3
To kill time; dawdle.
verb
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3
To draw (figures) while preoccupied.
verb
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3
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Origin of doodle

  • English dialectal to fritter away time perhaps from doodle fool doodlebug
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • The meaning "fool, simpleton" is intended in the song title "Yankee Doodle", originally sung by British colonial troops prior to the American Revolutionary War. This is also the origin of the early eighteenth century verb to doodle, meaning "to swindle or to make a fool of". The modern meaning emerged in the 1930s either from this meaning or from the verb "to dawdle", which since the seventeenth century has had the meaning of wasting time or being lazy.
    From Wiktionary
  • The word doodle first appeared in the early 17th century to mean a fool or simpleton. German variants of the etymon include Dudeltopf, Dudentopf, Dudenkopf, Dude and Dödel. American English dude may be a derivation of doodle.
    From Wiktionary
  • Influenced by dawdle, from German dudeln (“to play (the bagpipe)”), from dudel (“a bagpipe”), from Czech or Polish dudy (“a bagpipe”), from Turkish düdük (“a flute”).
    From Wiktionary