Stupid meaning

sto͝opĭd, styo͝o-
Frequency:
A stupid or foolish person.
noun
20
7
Lacking normal intelligence or understanding; slow-witted; dull.
adjective
17
3
Lacking in intelligence or exhibiting the quality of having been done by someone lacking in intelligence.

Because it's a big stupid jellyfish!

adjective
11
2
In a state of stupor; dazed; stunned; stupefied.
adjective
11
5
A stupid person.
noun
10
5
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Showing or resulting from a lack of normal intelligence; foolish; irrational.

A stupid idea.

adjective
7
2
Marked by a lack of intelligence or care; foolish or careless.

A stupid mistake.

adjective
6
2
Slow to learn or understand; obtuse.
adjective
5
5
To the point of stupor.

Neurobiology bores me stupid.

adjective
4
3
Tending to make poor decisions or careless mistakes.
adjective
4
4
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(slang, dated) Extremely.

My gear is stupid fly.

adverb
3
2
(archaic) Lacking sensation; inanimate; destitute of consciousness; insensate.
adjective
3
3
(slang) Amazing.

That dunk was stupid! His head was above the rim!

adjective
3
3
A stupid person; a fool.
noun
3
3
Dazed, stunned, or stupefied.

Felt stupid after taking the pain medication.

adjective
3
4
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Dull and boring; tiresome [a stupid party]

A stupid hat.

adjective
3
4
Used to express disparagement or exasperation.

Take your stupid notebook and go home.

adjective
2
2
(archaic) Characterized by or in a state of stupor; paralysed.
adjective
2
2
(slang) Damn, annoying, darn.

I fell over the stupid wire.

adjective
2
3
The definition of stupid is a person with less than normal intelligence or a boring situation.

An example of stupid is an adult who doesn't know the answer to 1+1.

An example of stupid is an unimportant meeting with dull conversation.

adjective
2
4
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Origin of stupid

  • Latin stupidus from stupēre to be stunned

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle French stupide, from Latin stupidus (“struck senseless, amazed"), from stupeō (“be amazed or confounded, be struck senseless"), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)tup- (“to wonder"), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)tu- (“to stand, stay"). Cognate with Old High German stubarōn (“to be astonished, be stunned, be blocked"). Related also to Old English stoppian (“to block, stop"). See stop.

    From Wiktionary