Tire meaning

tīr
To lose energy or strength; grow weary.

When you're sick, you tend to tire easily.

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Tire is defined as becoming weary or in need of rest, or to lose interest.

When you've been up for 17 hours and you start to feel sleepy, this is an example of when you tire.

If you play video games all the time and then get bored with them, this is an example of when you tire of video games.

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To grow bored or impatient.

The audience tired after the first 30 minutes of the movie.

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To diminish the energy or strength; fatigue.

The long walk tired me.

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To exhaust the interest or patience of.
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A covering for a wheel, usually made of rubber reinforced with cords of nylon, fiberglass, or other material and filled with compressed air.
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A hoop of metal or rubber fitted around a wheel.
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To adorn or attire.
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Attire.
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A headband or headdress.
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To become in need of rest; become weary or fatigued through exertion.
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To lose interest or patience; become bored or impatient.
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To diminish the strength of by exertion, etc.; fatigue; weary.
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To diminish the patience or interest of, as by dull talk, etc.; make weary; bore.
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A hoop of iron or rubber around the wheel of a vehicle, forming the tread.
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An inflatable, vulcanized rubber or synthetic casing sealed to a wheel rim by a specified pressure and designed to reduce shock, improve traction and handling, etc.; tubeless tire: it has replaced the tube-type tire which contains a separate, soft, thin rubber inner tube to hold the air.
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To furnish with tires.
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To attire or dress.
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Attire.
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A woman's headdress.
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(intransitive) To become sleepy or weary.
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To make sleepy or weary.
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(intransitive) To become bored or impatient (with)

I tire of this book.

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1621, Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy, New York Review of Books 2001, p. 66.

Men like apes follow the fashions in tires, gestures, actions: if the king laugh, all laugh [...]

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A covering for the head; a headdress.
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Metal rim of a wheel, especially that of a railroad locomotive.
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The rubber covering on a wheel; a tyre.
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A child's apron covering the upper part of the body, and tied with tape or cord; a pinafore. Also tier.
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(obsolete) To dress or adorn.
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Tiring-house.
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Ben Jonson.

Ye dregs of baseness, vultures among men, / That tire upon the hearts of generous spirits.

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Shakespeare.

Upon that were my thoughts tiring.

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A tier, row, or rank.
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The definition of a tire is a rubber wheel used on cars, bikes or other moving vehicles to improve traction.

A rubber wheel made by Goodyear or Firestone is an example of a tire.

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Origin of tire

  • Middle English iron rim of a wheel probably from tir attire short for atire from attiren to attire attire
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English tiren from Old English tēorian, tyrian deu-1 in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English tiren short for attiren to attire attire
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English tiren, tirien, teorien, from Old English tȳrian, tÄ“orian (“to fail, cease, become weary, be tired, exhausted; tire, weary, exhaust"), from Proto-Germanic *tiuzōnÄ… (“to cease"), from Proto-Indo-European *deus-, *dÄ“wǝ- (“to fail, be behind, lag"). Compare Ancient Greek δεύομαι (deýomai, “to lack"), Sanskrit [script?] (doá¹£a, “crime, fault, vice, deficiency"). [Devanagari?]
    From Wiktionary
  • French tirer (“to draw or pull"), akin to English tear (“to rend").
    From Wiktionary
  • From Middle English tire (“equipment") aphetic form of attire
    From Wiktionary