Tyre meaning

tīr
An ancient Phoenician city on the eastern Mediterranean Sea in present-day southern Lebanon. The capital of Phoenicia after the 11th century bc , it was a flourishing commercial center noted for its purple dyestuffs and rich, silken clothing. Tyre was besieged and captured by Alexander the Great in 332 bc and was destroyed by a Mameluke army in ad 1291.
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Seaport in SW Lebanon, on the Mediterranean: center of ancient Phoenician culture.
proper name
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(Australia, Ireland, New Zealand, UK) The ring-shaped protective covering around a wheel which is usually made of rubber or plastic composite and is either pneumatic or solid.
noun
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(India) Curdled milk.
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(obsolete) Attire.
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Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster's Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
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An ancient sea port and city state of Phoenecia, in present-day Lebanon.
pronoun
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Origin of tyre

  • The Oxford English Dictionary suggests that the word derives from attire, while other sources suggest a connection with the verb to tie. The spelling tyre is used in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia, and New Zealand after being revived in the 19th century. Both tyre and tire were used in the 15th and 16th centuries. The United States did not adopt the revival of tyre, and tire is the only spelling currently used there and in Canada.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Ancient Greek Τύρος (Turos, Týros), from Phoenician 𐤑𐤅𐤓 (“á¹¢ur") , after the rocky formation on which the town was originally built. Compare Latin Tyrus, Akkadian ð’‹—ð’Š’ (á¹¢urru). Cognate to Arabic صور (Ṣūr), Hebrew צוֹר (Tz), Tiberian Hebrew צר (Ṣōr), Turkish Sur.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Tamil.

    From Wiktionary