Port meaning

pôrt
The definition of a port is a harbor or place on the water where ships load and unload cargo.

An example of a port is Pier 43 in San Francisco.

An example of a port is Two Harbors Minnesota.

noun
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To modify (software) for use on a different machine or platform.
verb
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The left-hand side of a ship, boat, or airplane as one faces forward.
noun
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Of, relating to, or on the port.
adjective
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To turn (a craft) or make a shift to the port side.

Port the helm; ported sharply to avoid a shoal.

verb
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A gateway or portal, as to a town.
noun
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A rich sweet fortified wine.
noun
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To hold or carry (a weapon) diagonally across the body, with the muzzle or blade near the left shoulder.
verb
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The manner in which one carries oneself; bearing.
noun
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Portugal.
abbreviation
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Portuguese.
abbreviation
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A harbor.
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A city or town with a harbor where ships can load and unload cargo.
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A sweet, usually dark-red, fortified wine.
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To carry.
verb
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To carry, hold, or place (a rifle or sword) in front of one, diagonally upward from right to left, as for inspection.
verb
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The manner in which one carries oneself; carriage.
noun
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The position of a ported weapon.
noun
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Of or on this side.
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Designating a sailing tack on which the wind passes over the port side.
adjective
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To move or turn (the helm) to the port side.
verb
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A portal; gateway, esp. to a town or city.
noun
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Portugal.
abbreviation
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A place along a coast that gives ships and boats protection from storms and rough water; a harbor.
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The position of a rifle or other weapon when ported.
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An opening, as in a cylinder face or valve face, for the passage of steam, gas, water, etc.
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Portuguese.
abbreviation
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An opening, as in a cylinder or valve face, for the passage of steam or fluid.
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A place where data can pass into or out of a central processing unit, computer, or peripheral. With central processing units, a port is a fixed set of connections for incoming and outgoing data or instructions. With computers and peripherals, a port is generally a socket into which a connector can be plugged.
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(1) (noun) A number that identifies applications and services in a TCP/IP network. See TCP/IP port, port 80, well-known port and opening a port.
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A point of physical access or physical interface between a circuit and a device or system at which signals are injected or extracted. A given computer system may be equipped with a number of ports for various, specific purposes and with various attributes appropriate to the application. Ports can be defined as analog or digital and as optical or electrical, for example. The port speed is always defined, as well. A PBX, for example, may include a number of printed circuit boards (PCBs), each of which contains a number of specific interfaces. A PBX digital line card commonly contains 4, 8, 16, or 32 digital line ports, each of which provides the electrical interface between a digital telephone set and the PBX common equipment, and operates either at 64 kbps or, if ISDN, at 144 kbps.The line ports also are designed to support the appropriate signaling and control protocols, which commonly are proprietary protocols defined by the PBX manufacturer. A PBX digital trunk card may include one or more trunk ports specifically designed to interface with T1 (1.544 Mbps) or E-1 (2.048 Mbps) electrical circuits. A router may have a number of ports, some of which may be optical interfaces to fiber optic transmission systems (FOTS) running at speeds of 2.5 Gbps or perhaps 10 Gbps, and others of which may be electrical interfaces for connection to copper circuits running at T1 or E-1 speeds.
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A logical connection, identified by a protocol address in a packet header, associated with a Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) or User Datagram Protocol (UDP) service. Ports provide a mechanism by which computers running the TCP/IP protocol suite can multiplex a number of concurrent connections at a single Internet Protocol (IP) address. In combination, the IP address and the port number identify a socket, with a source socket and destination socket defining a TCP connection. Port numbers are 16-bit values ranging from 0 to 65,535.Well-known ports are numbered 0 through 1,023 for the use of system (root) processes or of programs executed by privileged users. Examples of well-known ports include 25 for SMTP (Simple Mail Transfer Protocol), 80 for HTTP (HyperText Transport Protocol), and 107 for Remote TELNET Service. Registered ports, which are registered by the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) as a convenience to the community, can be used by ordinary user processes or programs on most systems and can be executed by ordinary users.These same port assignments, numbered in the range 1,024 through 49,151, are used with the User Datagram Protocol (UDP) to the extent possible. Dynamic ports and/or private ports are those from 49,152 through 65,535.
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To modify or translate a software program so that it will run on a different computer operating system (OS).
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To move files from one computer to another.
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A place on the coast at which ships can shelter, or dock to load and unload cargo or passengers.
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A town or city containing such a place.
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(nautical, uncountable) The left-hand side of a vessel, including aircraft, when one is facing the front. Port does not change based on the orientation of the person aboard the craft.
noun
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(nautical) Of or relating to port, the left-hand side of a vessel.

On the port side.

adjective
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(nautical, chiefly imperative) To turn or put to the left or larboard side of a ship; said of the helm.

Port your helm!

verb
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(now Scotland, historical) An entryway or gate.

Him I accuse/The city ports by this hath enter'd "” Shakespeare, Coriolanus (1623), V.vi.

And from their ivory port the Cherubim,/Forth issuing at the accustomed hour, "” Milton, Paradise Lost (1667), book IV.

noun
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An opening or doorway in the side of a ship, especially for boarding or loading; an embrasure through which a cannon may be discharged; a porthole.

...her ports being within sixteen inches of the water... "” Sir W. Raleigh.

noun
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(curling, bowls) A space between two stones wide enough for a delivered stone or bowl to pass through.
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An opening where a connection (such as a pipe) is made.
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(computing) A logical or physical construct in and from which data are transferred. Computer port (hardware) on Wikipedia.
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(computing) A female connector of an electronic device, into which a cable's male connector can be inserted.
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(military) To hold or carry (a weapon) with both hands so that it lays diagonally across the front of the body, with the barrel or similar part near the left shoulder and the right hand grasping the small of the stock; or, to throw (the weapon) into this position on command.

Port arms!

...the angelic squadron...began to hem him round with ported spears. "” Milton, Paradise Lost (1667), book IV.

verb
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(computing, video games) To adapt, modify, or create a new version of, a program so that it works on a different platform. Porting (computing) on Wikipedia.
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(telephony) To carry or transfer an existing telephone number from one telephone service provider to another.
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Something used to carry a thing, especially a frame for wicks in candle-making.
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(archaic) The manner in which a person carries himself; bearing; deportment; carriage. See also portance.
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(military) The position of a weapon when ported; a rifle position executed by throwing the weapon diagonally across the front of the body, with the right hand grasping the small of the stock and the barrel sloping upward and crossing the point of the left shoulder.
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(computing) A program that has been adapted, modified, or recoded so that it works on a different platform from the one for which it was created; the act of this adapting.

Gamers can't wait until a port of the title is released on the new system.

The latest port of the database software is the worst since we made the changeover.

noun
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(computing, BSD) A set of files used to build and install a binary executable file from the source code of an application.
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A type of very sweet fortified wine, mostly dark red, traditionally made in Portugal.
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(Australia, Queensland, northern New South Wales, colloquial) A schoolbag or suitcase.
noun
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Port is a sweet dark-red wine which is fortified, often with brandy.

An example of port is a dessert wine normally served in a small glass.

noun
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A port of entry.
noun
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The left-hand side of a ship or aircraft facing forward.
noun
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An opening, as in a cylinder or valve face, for the passage of steam or fluid.
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A hole in an armored vehicle or a fortified structure for viewing or for firing weapons.
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Origin of port

  • French porter to carry from Old French from Latin portāre per-2 in Indo-European roots N., Middle English porte from Old French port from porter to carry
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English gate, porthole from Old French porte gate from Latin porta per-2 in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English from Old English from Latin portus per-2 in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Probably from port side from port
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • After Oporto
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Old French porter, from Latin portare (“carry"). Akin to transport, portable.
    From Wiktionary
  • Named from Portuguese Oporto, a city in Portugal from whence the wines were originally shipped.
    From Wiktionary
  • From Latin porta (“passage, gate"), reinforced in Middle English, from Old French porte.
    From Wiktionary
  • Old English port, from Latin portus (“port, harbour").
    From Wiktionary
  • Abbreviation of portmanteau.
    From Wiktionary