Portmanteau definition

pôrt-măntō, pôrtmăn-tō
A traveling case or bag; esp., a stiff leather suitcase that opens like a book into two compartments.
noun
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A combination word, or blend, that combines the sounds and meanings of two words. Modem, for example, is a portmanteau that combines the words modulate and demodulate, describing a device that performs both functions. Similarly, a codec both codes and decodes data, and a transceiver is both a transmitter and receiver. Lewis Carroll coined this usage of the word in his famous book Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There (1871). In the book, Humpty Dumpty explains to Alice the construct and meaning of words from the poem "Jabberwocky," telling her that "Well,`slithy' means `lithe and slimy.' . . .You see it's like a portmanteau -- there are two meanings packed up into one word."
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A large leather suitcase that opens into two hinged compartments.
noun
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General or generalized.

A portmanteau description; portmanteau terms.

adjective
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(Australia, dated) A school bag; often shortened to port or school port.
noun
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A word formed by merging the sounds and meanings of two different words, as chortle, from chuckle and snort.
noun
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A word or part of a word that is analyzable as consisting of more than one morpheme without a clear boundary between them, as French du “of the” from de “of” and le “the.”
noun
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An old type of leather suitcase that usually opened into two compartments. The word originates from the French portemanteau, from porter (to carry) and manteau (cloak), and inspired Lewis Carroll's use of the word with a new meaning.
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A large travelling case usually made of leather, and opening into two equal sections.
noun
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(linguistics) A portmanteau word.
noun
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(used only before a noun, of a word, story, etc.) Made by combining two (more) words, stories, etc., in the manner of a linguistic portmanteau.
adjective
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
portmanteau
Plural:
portmanteaus, portmanteaux

Origin of portmanteau

  • French portemanteau porte- from porter to carry (from Old French port5) manteau cloak (from Old French mantel) (from Latin mantellum) N., senses 2a and b, in reference to Lewis Carroll's Through the Looking-Glass, in which Humpty Dumpty explains slithy and other made-up words in the poem “Jabberwocky” to Alice as follows: “Slithy” means “lithe and slimy” ... You see it's like a portmanteau—there are two meanings packed up into one word

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Coined by Lewis Carroll in Through The Looking Glass to describe the words he coined in Jabberwocky.

    From Wiktionary

  • From French portemanteau, literally porte (“carry") + manteau (“coat")

    From Wiktionary