Porter meaning

pôrtər
Frequency:
A doorkeeper or gatekeeper.
noun
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A person who carries luggage and related objects.

By the time I reached the train station I was exhausted, but fortunately there was a porter waiting.

noun
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A person who carries luggage, etc. for hire or as an attendant at a railroad station, hotel, etc.
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1813-91; Union admiral in the Civil War: son of David.
proper name
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1920-2002; Brit. chemist.
proper name
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1890-1980; U.S. short-story writer, essayist, & novelist.
proper name
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A person in control of the entrance to a building.
noun
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In the bowling industry, an employee who clears and cleans tables and puts bowling balls away.
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A strong, dark ale, originally favored by porters, similar to a stout but less strong.
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(Ireland) Stout (malt brew).
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(computing) One who ports software (converts it to another platform).
noun
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To serve as a porter, to carry.
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The definition of a porter is a person who carries luggage at a hotel or on a train, who is responsible for manning the door at a hotel or a railroad employee who assists railroad passengers during their trip.

An example of a porter is the person who carries your luggage for you when you go into a hotel.

noun
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A person employed to carry burdens, especially an attendant who carries travelers' baggage at a hotel or transportation station.
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A railroad employee who waits on passengers in a sleeping car or parlor car.
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1
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A maintenance worker for a building or institution.
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1
One in charge of a gate or door.
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A dark beer resembling light stout, made from malt browned or charred by drying at a high temperature.
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1
The lowest of the four minor orders.
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1
An employee who sweeps, cleans, does errands, etc. as in a bank, store, or restaurant.
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A railroad employee who waits on passengers in a sleeper or parlor car.
noun
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1
A dark-brown beer made from charred or browned malt and produced by rapid fermentation at a relatively high temperature.
noun
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1
1891-1964; U.S. composer of popular songs.
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1780-1843; U.S. naval officer & diplomat.
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1

Origin of porter

  • Middle English portour from Anglo-Norman from Late Latin portātor from Latin portāre to carry per-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Anglo-Norman from Late Latin portārius from Latin porta gate per-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Short for porter's ale (probably so called because it was favored by laborers in the 1700s)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Anglo-Norman portour, from Old French porteor, from Latin portātor, from past participle of portare (“to carry")

    From Wiktionary

  • From Anglo-Norman portour, from Old French portier, from Late Latin portarius (“gatekeeper"), from porta (“gate").

    From Wiktionary