Stout meaning

stout
Courageous; brave; undaunted.
adjective
18
2
Fat; thickset; corpulent.
adjective
7
4
Powerful; forceful.
adjective
6
2
Materially strong, enduring.

Campers prefer stout vessels, sticks and cloth.

adjective
5
0
Latimer.

Commonly [...] they that be rich are lofty and stout.

adjective
3
1
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adjective
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A dark and strong malt brew made with toasted grain.

Stout is darker, stronger and sweeter than porter beer.

noun
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A dark-brown beer like porter, but heavier and sweeter and containing a higher percentage of hops.
noun
1
1
noun
0
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A large clothing size, for the corpulent.
noun
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(plural stouts)
noun
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Stout means bulky in figure or shape.

An example of stout is a short and fat beer mug.

adjective
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1
The definition of a stout is a dark and sweet type of beer that has a high percentage of hops.

An example of stout is Guinness.

noun
0
1
Having a strong flavor.

A cup of stout coffee.

adjective
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1
A very dark ale or lager beer.
noun
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1
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Having a strong flavor.

A cup of stout coffee.

adjective
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1
A very dark ale or lager beer.
noun
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1
A fat person.
noun
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1
A garment in a size for a fat man.
noun
0
1
Large; bulky, thickset; corpulent, fat.
adjective
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1
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Firm; resolute; dauntless.
adjective
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1
Clarendon.

He lost the character of a bold, stout, magnanimous man.

adjective
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2
Daniel.

The lords all stand / To clear their cause, most resolutely stout.

adjective
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2

Origin of stout

  • Middle English from Old French estout of Germanic origin stel- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English from Old French estout of Germanic origin stel- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English stout, from Old French estout (“brave, fierce, proud") (Modern French dialectal stout (“proud")), earlier estolt (“strong"), from Proto-Germanic *stultaz (“proud, stately, stiff"), from Proto-Germanic *stil-, *stal-, *stul- (“to be solid, stationary, firm, stiff"), from Proto-Indo-European *stel- (“to put, stand"); cognate with Dutch stout (“stout, bold, rash"), Low German stolt (“stately, proud"), German stolz (“proud, haughty, arrogant, stately"), Old Norse stoltr (“proud") (Danish stolt (“proud"), Icelandic stoltur (“proud")). Meaning "strong in body, powerfully built" is attested from c.1386, but has been to a large extent displaced by the euphemistic meaning "thick-bodied, fat and large," which is first recorded 1804. Original sense preserved in stout-hearted (1552). The noun "strong, dark-brown beer" is first recorded 1677, from the adjective.
    From Wiktionary