Sturdy definition

stûrdē
Substantially made or built; able to withstand stress or rough use.

A sturdy ladder; sturdy boots.

adjective
12
6
Marked by resoluteness or determination; firm.

Sturdy resistance.

adjective
9
6
That will not yield or compromise; firm; resolute.

Sturdy defiance.

adjective
9
7
Having or showing rugged physical strength or robust health.

A sturdy lifeguard; a sturdy build.

adjective
8
7
Of firm build; stiff; stout; strong.

A sturdy oak tree.

adjective
1
0
Advertisement
Solid in structure or person.

It was a sturdy building, able to withstand strong winds and cold weather.

The dog was sturdy and could work all day without getting tired.

adjective
1
0
Atterbury.

A sturdy, hardened sinner shall advance to the utmost pitch of impiety with less reluctance than he took the first steps.

adjective
1
0
Strongly built or constructed.
adjective
5
5
The definition of sturdy is something that will not break, a strong person or something that is well-constructed.

An example of something sturdy is a balance beam that can hold up to 400 pounds.

adjective
1
1
Resolute, in a good sense; or firm, unyielding quality.

A man of sturdy piety or patriotism.

adjective
0
0
Advertisement
A disease in sheep and cattle, marked by great nervousness, or by dullness and stupor.
noun
0
0
Physically strong; vigorous; hardy.
adjective
3
5
Having or showing rugged physical strength or robust health.

A sturdy lifeguard; a sturdy build.

adjective
3
5
noun
1
4

Other Word Forms

Adjective

Base Form:
sturdy
Comparative:
sturdier
Superlative:
sturdiest

Origin of sturdy

  • Middle English fierce, valiant, disobedient, strong from Old French estourdi dazed, reckless from past participle of estourdir to stun perhaps from Vulgar Latin exturdīre to be or act drunk like a thrush that has eaten fermented grapes or berries Latin ex- intensive pref. ex– Latin turdus thrush

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Circa 1300, in sense “unruly, reckless, violent", from Old French estourdi, form of estourdir, originally “to daze, to make tipsy (almost drunk)" (Modern French étourdir (“to daze, to make tipsy")), from Vulgar Latin *exturdire. Latin etymology is unclear - presumably it is ex- + turdus (“thrush (bird)"), but which this should mean “daze" is unclear. A speculative theory is that thrushes eat leftover winery grapes and thus became drunk, but this meets with objections.

    From Wiktionary

  • Disease in cows and sheep is by extension of sense of “daze", while sense of “strongly built" is of late 14th century, and relationship to earlier sense is less clear, perhaps from sense of a firm strike (causing a daze) or a strong, violent person.

    From Wiktionary