Disease definition

dĭ-zēz
An abnormal condition of a part, organ, or system of an organism resulting from various causes, such as infection, inflammation, environmental factors, or genetic defect, and characterized by an identifiable group of signs, symptoms, or both.
noun
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8
Any harmful or destructive condition, as of society.
noun
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5
An abnormal condition of a part, organ, or system of an organism resulting from various causes, such as infection, inflammation, environmental factors, or genetic defect, and characterized by an identifiable group of signs, symptoms, or both.
noun
24
4
A condition or tendency, as of society, regarded as abnormal and harmful.
noun
25
6
(obsolete) Lack of ease; trouble.
noun
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4
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A particular destructive process in an organ or organism, with a specific cause and characteristic symptoms; specif., an illness; ailment.
noun
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3
The definition of a disease is an illness or sickness with specific, well-defined symptoms that affects a person, plant or animal.

An example of a disease is cancer.

noun
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2
Any departure from health; illness in general.
noun
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Lack of ease; uneasiness; trouble; vexation; disquiet.
noun
3
1
To cause disease in; infect or derange.
verb
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(by extension) Any abnormal or harmful condition, as of society, people's attitudes, way of living etc.
noun
2
1
(pathology) An abnormal condition of the body or mind that causes discomfort or dysfunction; distinct from injury insofar as the latter is usually instantaneously acquired.

The tomato plants had some kind of disease that left their leaves splotchy and fruit withered.

noun
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2
1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, II.ii.

Mote he soft himselfe appease, / And fairely fare on foot, how euer loth; / His double burden did him sore disease.

verb
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To infect with a disease.
verb
1
2

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
disease
Plural:
diseases

Origin of disease

  • Middle English disese from Old French des- dis- aise ease ease

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English disese, from Anglo-Norman desese, disaise, from Old French desaise (dis- +‎ ease). Displaced native Middle English adle, audle (“disease”) (from Old English ādl (“disease, sickness”)), Middle English cothe, coathe (“disease”) (from Old English coþu (“disease”)).

    From Wiktionary