Ease meaning

ēz
Ease is defined as comfort, relaxation and freedom from pain, stress or anxiety.

An example of ease is how someone feels after receiving positive test results.

noun
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To free from pain, worry, or agitation.

Eased his conscience by returning the stolen money.

verb
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To fit or move by careful shifting, slow pressure, etc.

To ease a piano into place.

verb
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A state of rest, relaxation, or leisure.

He took his ease by the pond.

noun
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To slacken the strain, pressure, or tension of; loosen.

Ease off a cable.

verb
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To move or maneuver slowly and carefully.

Eased the car into a narrow space; eased the director out of office.

verb
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To lessen, as in discomfort, pressure, or stress.

Pain that never eased.

verb
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Freedom from pain, worry, or trouble; comfort.
noun
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Freedom from difficulty; facility; adroitness.

To write with ease.

noun
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Freedom from poverty; state of being financially secure; affluence.
noun
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To free from pain, worry, or trouble; comfort.
verb
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To make easier; facilitate.
verb
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To lessen in tension, speed, pain, etc.
verb
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The state of being comfortable or free from stress.

She enjoyed the ease of living in a house where the servants did all the work.

noun
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He played the organ with ease.

noun
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We took our ease on the patio.

noun
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(clothing) Additional space to allow movement within a garment.

To add ease to a waist measurement.

noun
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To alleviate, assuage or lessen (pain).

He loosened his shoe to ease the pain.

verb
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To loosen or slacken the tension on (something).

We eased the rope, then lowered the sail.

verb
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To reduce the difficulty of (something).

We had to ease the entry requirements.

verb
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(intransitive) To lessen in severity.

The pain eased overnight.

verb
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To reduce strain, tension, or pressure.
verb
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His mind was at ease when he received his pension.

noun
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Ease means to release or move away from pressure, tension or anxiety.

An example of ease is to slowly take steps to conquer a huge fear of swimming.

verb
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The condition of being comfortable or relieved.
noun
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Freedom from financial difficulty; affluence.

A life of luxury and ease.

noun
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To give respite from.

Eased the staff's burden by hiring more people.

verb
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To reduce the difficulty or trouble of.

Eased the entrance requirements.

verb
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To move or proceed with little effort.

Eased through life doing as little as possible.

verb
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Freedom from stiffness, formality, or awkwardness; natural, easy manner; poise.
noun
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Rest; leisure; relaxation.
noun
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To lessen or alleviate (pain, anxiety, etc.)
verb
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To move or be moved by careful shifting, slow pressure, etc.
verb
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To increase the amount of credit in the banking system, which the Federal Reserve does by lowering interest rates. This is accomplished by lowering the federal funds rate, the discount rate, or both. Increasing the available credit has the effect of stimulating the economy.
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Freedom from effort, difficulty or hardship.

He passed all the exams with ease.

noun
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Affluence and freedom from financial problems.

After winning the jackpot, she lived a life of luxurious ease.

noun
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To free (something) from pain, worry, agitation, etc.

He eased his conscience by confessing.

verb
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To give respite to (someone).

The provision of extra staff eased their workload.

verb
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To move (something) slowly and carefully.

He eased the cork from the bottle.

verb
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(intransitive) To proceed with little effort.

The car eased onto the motorway.

verb
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at ease
  • In a relaxed position, especially standing silently at rest with the right foot stationary:.
    Put the soldiers at ease while waiting for inspection.
  • Used as a command for troops to assume a relaxed position.
idiom
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at ease
  • Having no anxiety, pain, or discomfort.
idiom
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ease out
  • To tactfully persuade (an employee, tenant, etc.) to leave.
idiom
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ease the rudder
  • To reduce the angle the rudder makes with the fore-and-aft line so that the vessel will turn more gradually.
idiom
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take one's ease
  • To relax and be comfortable.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

ease out
ease the rudder

Origin of ease

  • Middle English ese from Old French aise elbowroom, physical comfort from Vulgar Latin adiacēs, adiac- adiac- alteration of Latin adiacēns, adiacent- present participle of adiacēre to lie near adjacent

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English ese, eise (“ease”), from Anglo-Norman ese (“ease”), Old French aise, eise (“convenience, leisure, comfort”), of unknown origin. Earliest meaning was that of "empty space, elbow-room, opportunity". Conflicting forms in Romance point to an external, non-Latin origin . Probably from a Germanic or Celtic source. Compare Old English ēaþe (“easy”), Gothic (azēti, “ease, pleasure”), Gothic (azēts, “easy”), Breton eaz, ez (“easy”), Irish adhais (“easy, leisure”). See also eath.

    From Wiktionary