Ease Definition

ēz
eased, eases, easing
noun
eases
The condition of being comfortable or relieved.
American Heritage
Freedom from pain, worry, or trouble; comfort.
Webster's New World
Freedom from stiffness, formality, or awkwardness; natural, easy manner; poise.
Webster's New World
Freedom from constraint or embarrassment; naturalness.
American Heritage
Freedom from difficulty; facility; adroitness.
To write with ease.
Webster's New World
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verb
eased, eases, easing
To move or be moved by careful shifting, slow pressure, etc.
Webster's New World
To free from pain, worry, or trouble; comfort.
Webster's New World
To lessen in tension, speed, pain, etc.
Webster's New World
To lessen or alleviate (pain, anxiety, etc.)
Webster's New World
To make easier; facilitate.
Webster's New World
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other
To increase the amount of credit in the banking system, which the Federal Reserve does by lowering interest rates. This is accomplished by lowering the federal funds rate, the discount rate, or both. Increasing the available credit has the effect of stimulating the economy.
Webster's New World Finance
idiom
at ease
  • In a relaxed position, especially standing silently at rest with the right foot stationary:

    put the soldiers at ease while waiting for inspection.

  • Used as a command for troops to assume a relaxed position.
American Heritage
at ease
  • having no anxiety, pain, or discomfort
Webster's New World
ease out
  • to tactfully persuade (an employee, tenant, etc.) to leave
Webster's New World
ease the rudder
  • to reduce the angle the rudder makes with the fore-and-aft line so that the vessel will turn more gradually
Webster's New World
take one's ease
  • to relax and be comfortable
Webster's New World
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Idioms, Phrasal Verbs Related to Ease

Origin of Ease

  • From Middle English ese, eise (“ease”), from Anglo-Norman ese (“ease”), Old French aise, eise (“convenience, leisure, comfort”), of unknown origin. Earliest meaning was that of "empty space, elbow-room, opportunity". Conflicting forms in Romance point to an external, non-Latin origin . Probably from a Germanic or Celtic source. Compare Old English ēaþe (“easy”), Gothic (azēti, “ease, pleasure”), Gothic (azēts, “easy”), Breton eaz, ez (“easy”), Irish adhais (“easy, leisure”). See also eath.

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English ese from Old French aise elbowroom, physical comfort from Vulgar Latin adiacēs, adiac- adiac- alteration of Latin adiacēns, adiacent- present participle of adiacēre to lie near adjacent

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

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