Maneuver meaning

mə-no͝ovər, -nyo͝o-
To maneuver is defined as to move in a skillful manner or to complete a series of skillful moves or a carefully planned scheme.

An example of maneuver is when you have to turn your car to parallel park.

An example of manuever is when you are carrying out the steps of a devious plan.

verb
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To manipulate into a desired position or toward a predetermined goal.

Maneuvered him into signing the contract.

verb
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The definition of maneuver is a careful and skillful move or series of moves or a scheme or plot that requires skill to carry out.

An example of a maneuver is parallel parking.

An example of a maneuver is a scheme to hide money losses that involves tricky financial maneuvers.

noun
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To make a controlled series of changes in movement or direction toward an objective.

Maneuvered to get closer to the stage.

verb
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To carry out a military or naval maneuver.
verb
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To make a controlled series of changes in movement or direction toward an objective.

Maneuvered to get closer to the stage.

verb
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To carry out a military or naval maneuver.
verb
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To act with skill or cunning in gaining an end.

The opposition maneuvered to force a vote.

verb
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To move or direct through a series of movements or changes in course.

Maneuvered the drill into position; maneuvered the car through traffic.

verb
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To alter the tactical placement of (troops or warships).
verb
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A planned and controlled tactical or strategic movement of troops, warships, aircraft, etc.
noun
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Large-scale practice movements and exercises of troops, warships, aircraft, etc. under simulated battle conditions.
noun
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Any skillful change of movement or direction in driving or controlling a vehicle or craft.
  • Any change of aircraft movement executed by the pilot.
  • A series of aircraft movements executed by the pilot according to a specific pattern, as a roll, a loop, etc.
noun
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Any movement or procedure intended as a skillful or shrewd step toward some objective; stratagem; artifice; scheme.
noun
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To perform or cause to perform a maneuver or maneuvers.
verb
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To manage or plan skillfully or shrewdly; manipulate or scheme.
verb
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A movement, often one performed with difficulty.

Parallel parking can be a difficult maneuver.

noun
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(often in the plural) A large training field-exercise of military troops.

The army was on maneuvers.

Joint NATO maneuvers are as much an exercise in diplomacy as in tactics and logistics.

noun
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An adroit or cunning action; a stratagem.
noun
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To move (something) carefully, and often with difficulty, into a certain position.
verb
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(figuratively) To guide, steer, manage purposefully.
verb
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(figuratively, intransitive) To intrigue, manipulate, plot, scheme.

The patriarch maneuvered till his offspring occupied countless key posts.

verb
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To act with skill or cunning in gaining an end.

The opposition maneuvered to force a vote.

verb
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1
To move or direct through a series of movements or changes in course.

Maneuvered the drill into position; maneuvered the car through traffic.

verb
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1
To alter the tactical placement of (troops or warships).
verb
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1
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To manipulate into a desired position or toward a predetermined goal.

Maneuvered him into signing the contract.

verb
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1

Origin of maneuver

  • French manœuvre from Old French maneuvre manual work from Medieval Latin manuopera from Latin manū operārī to work by hand manū ablative of manus hand man-2 in Indo-European roots operārī to work op- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • French manœuvre from Old French maneuvre manual work from Medieval Latin manuopera from Latin manū operārī to work by hand manū ablative of manus hand man-2 in Indo-European roots operārī to work op- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle French manÅ“uvre (“manipulation, maneuver") and manÅ“uvrer (“to maneuver"), from Old French manovre (“handwork, manual labour"), from Medieval Latin manopera, manuopera (“work done by hand, handwork"), from manu (“by hand") + operari (“to work"). First recorded in the Capitularies of Charlemagne (800 CE) to mean "chore, manual task", probably as a calque of the Frankish *handwerc (“hand-work"). Compare Old English handweorc, handÄ¡eweorc, German Handwerk.

    From Wiktionary