Evolution meaning

ĕvə-lo͝oshən, ēvə-
Evolution is defined as the process of growth and development or the theory that organisms have grown and developed from past organisms.

An example of evolution is how cell phones have changed over time.

An example of evolution is the theory started by Charles Darwin that theorizes about how humans came to be in their present form.

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A continuing process of change from one state, condition, or form to another.
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(math.) The extracting of a root of a given number.
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(dance, sports) A turning movement of the body.
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(military) One of a series of ordered movements.
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(chemistry) The act or an instance of giving off gas; emission.
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(mathematics) The extraction of a root from a quantity.
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Change in the genetic composition of a population during successive generations, often resulting in the development of new species. The mechanisms of evolution include natural selection acting on the genetic variation among individuals, mutation, migration, and genetic drift.
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The process by which species of organisms arise from earlier life forms and undergo change over time through natural selection . The modern understanding of the origins of species is based on the theories of Charles Darwin combined with a modern knowledge of genetics based on the work of Gregor Mendel. Darwin observed there is a certain amount of variation of traits or characteristics among the different individuals belonging to a population. Some of these traits confer fitness—they allow the individual organism that possesses them to survive in their environment better than other individuals who do not possess them and to leave more offspring. The offspring then inherit the beneficial traits, and over time the adaptive trait spreads through the population. In twentieth century, the development of the the science of genetics helped explain the origin of the variation of the traits between individual organisms and the way in which they are passed from generation to generation. This basic model of evolution has since been further refined, and the role of genetic drift and sexual selection in the evolution of populations has been recognized.
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A movement that is part of a set of ordered movements.

Naval evolutions in preparation for battle.

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(astronomy) Change in the structure, chemical composition, or dynamical properties of a celestial object or system such as a planetary system, star, or galaxy. Evolution often changes the observable or measurable characteristics of the object or system.
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A setting free or giving off, as of gas in a chemical reaction.
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(mil.) Any of various movements or maneuvers by which troops, ships, etc. change formation.
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A process of development and change from one state to another, as of the universe in its development through time.
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(general) Gradual directional change especially one leading to a more advanced or complex form; growth; development.

The evolution of the universe began with a bang.

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(biology) The change in the genetic composition of a population over successive generations.
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(mathematics) The extraction of a root of a quantity.
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An unfolding, opening out, or working out; process of development, as from a simple to a complex form, or of gradual, progressive change, as in a social and economic structure.
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A result or product of this; thing evolved.
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Origin of evolution

  • Latin ēvolūtiō ēvolūtiōn- from ēvolūtus past participle of ēvolvere to unroll evolve

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin ēvolūtiō (“the act of unrolling, unfolding or opening (of a book)”), from ēvolūtus, perfect passive participle of ēvolvō (“unroll, unfold”), from ē (“out of”), short form of ex, + volvō (“roll”).

    From Wiktionary