Stress meaning

strĕs
Stress means physical or mental tension.

An example of stress is the pressure to finish three large projects by the end of the day.

An example of stress is discomfort and pain in your arms from carrying too heavy of an item.

An example of stress is hypertension, which can result from a reaction to a situation in which a person feels threatened or pressured.

noun
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Stress is defined as causing mental and physical strain or tension.

An example of stress is to constantly ask someone questions while she is working on an important project that is due soon.

verb
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2
To place emphasis on.

Stressed basic fire safety in her talk.

verb
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An accent or mark representing such emphasis or force.
noun
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noun
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Importance, significance, or emphasis placed on something.
noun
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Strain or straining force.
  • Force exerted upon a body, that tends to strain or deform its shape.
  • The intensity of such force, usually measured in pounds per square inch.
  • The opposing reaction or cohesiveness of a body resisting such force.
noun
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Emphasis; importance; significance.
noun
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To give stress or accent to.
verb
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An applied force or system of forces that tends to strain or deform a body.
noun
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A female person associated with (something specified)
affix
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To emphasize.
verb
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A female person who is, does, or creates (something specified)

Songstress.

affix
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A condition of metabolic or physiologic impairment in an organism, occurring usually in response to adverse events and capable of causing physical damage.
noun
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A condition of psychological strain occurring usually in response to adverse events and capable of causing symptoms and signs such as increased blood pressure, insomnia, and irritability.
noun
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The force per unit area applied to an object. Objects subject to stress tend to become distorted or deformed.
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(countable, physics) The internal distribution of force per unit area (pressure) within a body reacting to applied forces which causes strain or deformation and is typically symbolised by σ
noun
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(countable, physics) Externally applied to a body which cause internal stress within the body.
noun
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(uncountable) Emotional pressure suffered by a human being or other animal.

Go easy on him, he's been under a lot of stress lately.

noun
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(uncountable, phonetics) The emphasis placed on a syllable of a word.

Some people put the stress on the first syllable of “controversy"; others put it on the second.

noun
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(uncountable) Emphasis placed on words in speaking.
noun
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(uncountable) Emphasis placed on a particular point in an argument or discussion (whether spoken or written).
noun
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(Scotland, law) Distress; the act of distraining; also, the thing distrained.
noun
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To apply force to (a body or structure) causing strain.
verb
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To apply emotional pressure to (a person or animal).
verb
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(informal) To suffer stress; to worry or be agitated.
verb
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To emphasise (a syllable of a word).

“Emphasis" is stressed on the first syllable, but “emphatic" is stressed on the second.

verb
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To emphasise (words in speaking).
verb
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To emphasise (a point) in an argument or discussion.

I must stress that this information is given in strict confidence.

verb
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To give prominence of sound to (a syllable or word) in pronouncing or in accordance with a metrical pattern.
verb
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To subject to physiological or mental stress or strain. Often used with out .

The pressure of the deadline is really stressing me out.

verb
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To subject to mechanical pressure or force.
verb
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2
To undergo physiological or mental stress, as from working too much. Often used with out.
verb
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Origin of stress

  • From Webster's New World College Dictionary, 5th Edition
  • Middle English stresse hardship partly from destresse (from Old French distress) and partly from Old French estrece narrowness, oppression (from Vulgar Latin strictia) (from Latin strictus) (past participle of stringere to draw tight strait)
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • In the sense of "mental strain" or “disruption", used occasionally in the 1920s and 1930s by psychologists, including Walter Cannon (1934); in “biological threat", used by endocrinologist Hans Selye, by metaphor with stress in physics (force on an object) in the 1930s, and popularized by same in the 1950s.
    From Wiktionary
  • From Middle English destresse, from Old French, from Latin stringere (“to draw tight").
    From Wiktionary