Relax meaning

rĭ-lăks'
To relax is defined as to become calm, to loosen, or to calm down.

An example of to relax is to sit on the couch and watch TV after a long day of work.

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To make less severe or strict.

Relax a curfew.

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To relieve from tension or strain.

The warm bath relaxed me.

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To make lax or loose.

Relax one's grip.

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To take one's ease; rest.
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To become lax or loose.
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To become less severe or strict.
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To become less restrained or tense.
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To make looser, or less firm or tense.

To relax one's grip.

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To make less strict or severe; soften.

To relax discipline.

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To abate; reduce; slacken.

To relax one's efforts.

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To release from intense concentration, hard work, worry, etc.; give rest to.

To relax the mind.

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To treat (tightly curled hair) with a chemical solution so as to loosen the curls.
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To become looser or less firm, as the muscles.
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To become less tense or stern, as one's features.
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To become less strict, or milder, as discipline.
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To become easier, or less stiff, in manner.
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To rest from effort, worry, or work, as by lying down, engaging in recreation, etc.
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To calm down.
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To make something loose.

To relax a rope or cord; to relax the muscles or sinews.

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(intransitive) To become loose.
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To make something less severe or tense.

To relax discipline; to relax one's attention or endeavours.

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(intransitive) To become less severe or tense.
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To make something (such as codes and regulations) more lenient.

1953, Edward Corwin, “Section 2. Jurisdiction", in The Constitution of the United States of America: Analysis and Interpretation, page 589:The Court rejected the contention that the doctrine of sovereign immunity should be relaxed as inapplicable to suits for specific relief as distinguished from damage suits, saying: "The Government, as representative of the community as a whole, cannot be stopped in its tracks by any plaintiff who presents a disputed question of property or contract right."

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(intransitive, of codes and regulations) To become more lenient.
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To relieve (something) from stress.

Amusement relaxes the mind.

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(dated) To relieve from constipation; to loosen; to open.

An aperient relaxes the bowels.

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To reduce in intensity; slacken.

Relax one's efforts.

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Origin of relax

  • Middle English relaxen from Old French relaxer from Latin relaxāre re- re- laxāre to loosen (from laxus loose slēg- in Indo-European roots)
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Old French relaxer, from Latin relaxāre (“relax, loosen, open"), from re- (“back") + laxāre (“loosen"), from laxus (“loose, free").
    From Wiktionary