Excite meaning

ĭk-sīt
To put into motion or activity; stir up.

Tapping on the hive excited the bees.

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Excite is defined as to stir up emotions, action or strong reactions.

An example of excite is telling a group of children they're going to get ice cream.

An example of excite is a fire engine with sirens blaring while driving past a house with many dogs.

verb
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To call forth; arouse; provoke.

The rumors excited her curiosity.

verb
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(physics) To raise (a nucleus, atom, etc.) to a higher energy state.
verb
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To arouse the feelings or passions of.

The news excited us.

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(physiol.) To produce or increase the response of (an organism, organ, tissue, etc.) to a proper stimulus.
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(Excite.com, Irvington, NY, www.excite.com) One of the major search engines on the Web founded in 1995 and part of IAC Search & Media. Excite was acquired by Ask Jeeves, Inc. in 2004, which was acquired by IAC in 2005. See Web search engines.
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To stir the emotions of.

The fireworks which opened the festivities excited anyone present.

verb
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To arouse or bring out (eg feelings); to stimulate.

Favoritism tends to excite jealousy in the ones not being favored.

The political reforms excited unrest among to population.

There are drugs designed to excite certain nerves in our body.

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(physics) To cause an electron to move to a higher than normal state; to promote an electron to an outer level.

By applying electric potential to the neon atoms, the electrons become excited, then emit a photon when returning to normal.

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Origin of excite

  • Middle English exciten from Latin excitāre frequentative of exciēre ex- ex- ciēre to set in motion keiə- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English exciten, from Old French exciter, from Latin excitare (“call out, call forth, arouse, wake up, stimulate”), frequentative of exciere (“call out, arouse excite”), from ex (“out”) + ciere (“call, summon”). See cite and compare to accite, concite, incite.

    From Wiktionary