Rouse meaning

rouz
To give rise to; bring about.

An ad that roused my curiosity; a book that roused a furor.

verb
5
0
To cause (someone) to be active, attentive, or excited; stir up.
verb
4
0
To rouse is to bring someone out of sleep, or to stir up an emotion.

When you wake someone up, this is an example of a time when you rouse him.

When you cause someone to become active who wasn't, this is an example of a time when you rouse him.

When you cause someone to feel angry, this is an example of a time when you rouse anger.

verb
3
0
To wake (someone) up.
verb
3
0
To awaken.
verb
3
0
Advertisement
To become active, attentive, or excited.
verb
0
0
To cause (game) to rise from cover, come out of a lair, etc.; stir up to flight or attack.
verb
0
0
To stir up, as to anger or action; excite.
verb
0
0
To cause to come out of a state of sleep, repose, unconsciousness, etc.; wake.
verb
0
0
(naut.) To pull with force, esp. by hand; haul.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
To rise from cover, etc.
verb
0
0
To come out of a state of sleep, repose, etc.; wake.
verb
0
0
To become active.
verb
0
0
The act of rousing.
noun
0
0
A violent stir.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
A drink of liquor.
noun
0
0
A carousal.
noun
0
0
noun
0
0
An official ceremony over drinks.

And the King's rouse the heaven shall bruit again,

Re-speaking earthly thunder. - "Hamlet" by William Shakespeare, act 1 scene 2 lines 127-128

noun
0
0
A carousal; a festival; a drinking frolic.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
(military, UK and Canada) The sounding of a bugle in the morning after reveille, to signal that soldiers are to rise from bed, often the rouse.
noun
0
0
To wake or be awoken from sleep, or from apathy.

To rouse the faculties, passions, or emotions.

verb
0
0
To provoke (someone) to anger or action.
  • Milton.
    Blustering winds, which all night long / Had roused the sea.
verb
0
0
To cause to start from a covert or lurking place.

To rouse a deer or other animal of the chase.

verb
0
0
(nautical) To pull by main strength; to haul.
verb
0
0
Advertisement

Origin of rouse

  • Middle English rousen to shake the feathers: used of a hawk perhaps from Old French reuser, ruser to repel, push back from Vulgar Latin recūsāre from Latin to refuse recuse

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English rowsen, rouzen, rusen (“to rush out"), from Old Norse *rÅ«sa (“to storm out, rush"), from Proto-Germanic *rÅ«sanÄ… (“to bluster, be fierce, storm"), from Proto-Indo-European *(o)rewǝ- (“to move, drive, agitate"). Cognate with Swedish rusa (“to rush, hurry, dash, scurry"), Danish ruse (“to rush"), Middle Dutch rÅ«sen (“to race, rage"), Middle Low German rÅ«sen (“to rush, bluster, make a clamour"). More at rush.

    From Wiktionary