Sleep meaning

slēp
A natural, reversible state of rest in most vertebrate animals, occurring at regular intervals and necessary for the maintenance of health. During sleep, the eyes usually close, the muscles relax, and responsiveness to external stimuli decreases. Growth and repair of the tissues of the body are thought to occur, and energy is conserved and stored. In humans and certain other animals, sleep occurs in five stages, the first four consisting of non-REM sleep and the last stage consisting of REM sleep . These stages constitute a sleep cycle that repeats itself about five times during a normal episode of sleep. Each cycle is longer that the one preceding it because the length of the REM stage increases with every cycle until waking occurs. Stage I is characterized by drowsiness, Stage II by light sleep, and Stages III and IV by deep sleep. Stages II and III repeat themselves before REM sleep (Stage V), which occurs about 90 minutes after the onset of sleep. During REM sleep, dreams occur, and memory is thought to be organized. In the stages of non-REM sleep, there are no dreams, and brain activity decreases while the body recovers from wakeful activity. The amount and periodicity of sleep in humans vary with age, with infants sleeping frequently for shorter periods, and mature adults sleeping for longer uninterrupted periods.
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Sleep is defined as to slumber, rest or be in a state of inactivity like sleep.

An example of sleep is what you do when you go to bed at midnight, close your eyes and rest through the night.

verb
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Sleep is the act of slumbering, during which time your body systems refresh themselves.

An example of sleep is laying in bed at night with your eyes closed and having no conscious thought for a period of seven or eight hours.

noun
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The folding together of leaflets or petals at night or in the absence of light.
noun
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A crust of dried tears or mucus normally forming around the inner rim of the eye during sleep.
noun
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To be in the state of sleep or to fall asleep.
verb
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Any state of inactivity thought of as like sleep, as death, unconsciousness, hibernation, etc.
noun
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To be in a condition resembling sleep.
verb
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To pass or get rid of by sleeping.

Slept away the day; went home to sleep off the headache.

verb
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To provide sleeping accommodations for.

This tent sleeps three comfortably.

verb
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The gritty or gummy residue in or around the eyes after a period of sleep.
noun
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noun
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To be in the state of sleep; slumber.
verb
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To be in a state of inactivity like sleep, as that of death, quiescence, hibernation, inattention, etc.
verb
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To have sexual intercourse (with, together, etc.)
verb
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To assume a nyctitropic position at night, as petals or leaves.
verb
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To slumber in (a specified kind of sleep)

To sleep the sleep of the just.

verb
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To provide sleeping accommodations for.

A boat that sleeps four.

verb
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A natural periodic state of rest for the mind and body, in which the eyes usually close and consciousness is completely or partially lost, so that there is a decrease in bodily movement and responsiveness to external stimuli. During sleep the brain undergoes a characteristic cycle of brain-wave activity that includes intervals of dreaming.
noun
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To be in the state of sleep.
verb
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(1) An inactive state. See sleep mode.
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(uncountable) The state of reduced consciousness during which a human or animal rests in a daily rhythm.

I really need some sleep.

We need to conduct an overnight sleep test to diagnose your sleep problem.

noun
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(countable, informal) An act or instance of sleeping.

I'm just going to have a quick sleep.

noun
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(uncountable) Rheum found in the corner of the eyes after waking, whether real or a figurative objectification of sleep (in the sense of reduced consciousness).

Wipe the sleep from your eyes.

noun
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A state of plants, usually at night, when their leaflets approach each other and the flowers close and droop, or are covered by the folded leaves.
noun
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(intransitive) To rest in a state of reduced consciousness.

You should sleep 8 hours a day.

verb
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(intransitive) (Of a spinning top) To spin on its axis with no other perceptible motion.

When a top is sleeping, it is spinning but not precessing.

verb
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To accommodate in beds.

This caravan can sleep up to four people.

verb
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To be slumbering in (a state).

To sleep a dreamless sleep.

verb
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To be careless, inattentive, or unconcerned; not to be vigilant; to live thoughtlessly.
verb
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To be dead; to lie in the grave.
verb
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To be, or appear to be, in repose; to be quiet; to be unemployed, unused, or unagitated; to rest; to lie dormant.

A question sleeps for the present; the law sleeps.

verb
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sleep like a log
  • To sleep very deeply.
idiom
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put to sleep
  • To make (someone) weary and bored to, or as if to, the point of inducing sleep.
  • To put (a pet) to death in a humane manner.
idiom
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sleep around
  • To have promiscuous sexual relations.
idiom
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sleep away
  • To spend in sleeping; sleep during.
  • To get rid of by sleeping.
idiom
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sleep in
  • To sleep at the place where one is employed as a household servant.
  • To sleep much later into the morning than one usually does.
idiom
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sleep it off
  • To rid oneself of the effects of some excess, overindulgence, etc., specif. of the aftereffects of drinking much alcoholic liquor, by sleeping.
idiom
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sleep like a log
  • To sleep undisturbed and very deeply.
idiom
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sleep on it
  • To postpone making a decision until the next day.
idiom
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sleep out
  • To sleep outdoors.
idiom
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sleep over
  • To spend the night at another's home.
idiom
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Origin of sleep

  • Middle English slepe from Old English slǣp slēb- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English slepen, from Old English slÇ£pan (“to sleep"), from Proto-Germanic *slÄ“panÄ… (“to sleep"), from Proto-Indo-European *slab-, *slap-, *(s)lÁb- (“to hang loose, be limp"). Cognate with West Frisian sliepe (“to sleep"), North Frisian sliepen (“to sleep"), Low German slapen (“sleep"), Dutch slapen (“to sleep"), German schlafen (“to sleep"), Russian слабый (slábyj, “weak").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English sleep, sleepe, from Old English slÇ£p (“sleep"), from Proto-Germanic *slÄ“paz (“sleep"), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)lāb- (“to hang loosely, be limp, be languid"). Cognate with West Frisian sliep (“sleep"), Saterland Frisian släipe (“sleep"), Low German Slaap (“sleep"), Dutch slaap (“sleep"), German Schlaf (“sleep"), Russian слабый (slábyj, “weak").

    From Wiktionary