Trance meaning

trăns
A condition of great mental concentration or abstraction, esp. one induced by religious fervor or mysticism.
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To put into a trance; entrance.
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The definition of a trance is an altered state of mind where you can't move, or being stunned in a way that resembles this state, or the state of a person connecting to the spirit world.

An example of a trance is the state of hypnosis.

An example of a trance is someone's state after the shock of a car accident.

An example of a trance is the state of a medium at a séance.

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A hypnotic, cataleptic, or ecstatic state.
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Detachment from one's physical surroundings, as in contemplation or daydreaming.
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A semiconscious state, as between sleeping and waking; a daze.
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A genre of electronic dance music with a fast tempo, repetitive phrasing, and often an hypnotic effect.
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A state of altered consciousness, somewhat resembling sleep, during which voluntary movement is lost, as in hypnosis.
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A stunned condition; daze; stupor.
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In spiritualistic belief, a condition in which a medium passes under the control of some external force, as for the transmission of communications from the dead during a séance.
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A hypnotic, cataleptic, or ecstatic state.
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Detachment from one's physical surroundings, as in contemplation or daydreaming.
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A semiconscious state, as between sleeping and waking; a daze.
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To put into a trance; entrance.
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A dazed or unconscious condition.
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(consciousness) A state of concentration, awareness and/or focus that filters information and experience; e.g. meditation, possession, etc.
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(psychology) A state of low response to stimulus and diminished, narrow attention.
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(psychology) The previous state induced by hypnosis.
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(uncountable) Trance music, a genre of electronic dance music.
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Tennyson.

When thickest dark did trance the sky.

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Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster's Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
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Origin of trance

  • Middle English traunce from Old French transe passage, fear, vision from transir to die, be numb with fear from Latin trānsīre to go over or across transient

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English traunce, from Old French transe (“fear of coming evil", "passage from life to death"), from transir (“to be numb with fear", "die", "pass on"), from Latin trānseō (“to cross over")

    From Wiktionary