Catch meaning

kăch, kĕch
Catch means to capture or take something.

An example of catch is to reel in a fish.

verb
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To become held, entangled, or fastened.

My coat caught in the car door.

verb
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To become ignited.

The fire caught.

verb
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To deceive.

Failed to be caught by their fraudulent schemes.

verb
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(baseball) To play (a game) as catcher.
verb
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A tricky or previously unsuspected condition or drawback.

It sounds like a good offer, but there may be a catch.

noun
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To act or move so as to hold or grab someone or something.

Tried to catch at the life preserver.

verb
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To be communicable or infectious; spread.
verb
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(baseball) To act as catcher.
verb
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A device for fastening something or for checking motion.

The car's hood has a safety catch.

noun
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A tricky or disadvantageous condition; a catch.
noun
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To seize and hold, as after a chase; capture.
verb
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To seize or take by or as by a trap, snare, etc.
verb
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To deceive; ensnare.
verb
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To discover by taking unawares; surprise in some act.

To be caught stealing.

verb
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A choking or stoppage of the breath or voice.

A catch in his voice.

noun
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A snatch; a fragment.

Could only hear catches of the song.

noun
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(music) A canonic, often rhythmically intricate composition for three or more voices, popular especially in the 17th and 18th centuries.
noun
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A situation in which a desired outcome or solution is impossible to attain because of a set of inherently contradictory rules or conditions.
noun
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A contradictory or self-defeating course of action.
noun
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To strike suddenly; hit.

The blow caught him in the arm.

verb
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To intercept the motion or action of; lay hold of; grab or snatch.

To catch a ball.

verb
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To take or get passively; incur or contract without intention, as by exposure.

To catch the mumps.

verb
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To captivate; charm.
verb
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To cause to be entangled or snagged.

To catch one's heel in a rug.

verb
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(baseball) To act as catcher for (a specified pitcher, a specified game, etc.)
verb
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To become held, fastened, or entangled.

Her sleeve caught on a nail.

verb
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To take hold or spread, as fire.
verb
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To take fire; burn.
verb
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To take and keep hold, as a lock.
verb
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To act or serve as a catcher.
verb
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The act of catching.
noun
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A thing that catches or holds.
noun
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The person or thing caught.
noun
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The amount caught.
noun
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A person worth catching, esp. as a husband or wife.
noun
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A snatch, scrap, or fragment.

Catches of old tunes.

noun
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A break in the voice, caused by emotion.
noun
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An exercise or a simple game consisting of throwing and catching a ball.
noun
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(informal) A hidden qualification; tricky condition.

A catch in his offer.

noun
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(music) A round for three or more unaccompanied voices.
noun
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(sports) A catching of a ball in a specified manner.
noun
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(baseball) The catching of a ball in flight and holding it firmly.
noun
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Designed to trick; tricky.

A catch question on an exam.

adjective
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Attracting or meant to attract attention or interest.
adjective
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A paradox in a law, regulation, or practice that makes one a victim of its provisions no matter what one does.
noun
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(countable) The act of seizing or capturing. syn.

The catch of the perpetrator was the product of a year of police work.

noun
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(countable) The act of catching an object in motion, especially a ball. syn. transl.

The player made an impressive catch.

Nice catch!

noun
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(countable) The act of noticing, understanding or hearing. syn. transl.

Good catch. I never would have remembered that.

noun
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(uncountable) The game of catching a ball. transl.

The kids love to play catch.

noun
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(countable) A find, in particular a boyfriend or girlfriend or prospective spouse. syn. transl.

Did you see his latest catch?

He's a good catch.

noun
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(countable) Something which is captured or caught. transl. syn.

The fishermen took pictures of their catch.

The catch amounted to five tons of swordfish.

noun
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(countable) A stopping mechanism, especially a clasp which stops something from opening. syn. transl.

She installed a sturdy catch to keep her cabinets closed tight.

noun
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(countable) A hesitation in voice, caused by strong emotion.

There was a catch in his voice when he spoke his father's name.

noun
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(countable, sometimes noun adjunct) A concealed difficulty, especially in a deal or negotiation. syn. transl.

It sounds like a great idea, but what's the catch?

Be careful, that's a catch question.

noun
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(countable) A crick; a sudden muscle pain during unaccustomed positioning when the muscle is in use.

I bent over to see under the table and got a catch in my side.

noun
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(countable) A fragment of music or poetry. syn.
noun
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T. Fuller.

The common and the canon law […] lie at catch, and wait advantages one against another.

noun
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(countable, agriculture) A crop which has germinated and begun to grow.
noun
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(countable, music) A type of humorous round in which the voices gradually catch up with one another; usually sung by men and often having bawdy lyrics.
noun
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(countable, music) The refrain; a line or lines of a song which are repeated from verse to verse. syn.
noun
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(countable, cricket, baseball) The act of catching a hit ball before it reaches the ground, resulting in an out.
noun
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(countable, cricket) A player in respect of his catching ability; particularly one who catches well.
noun
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(countable, rowing) The first contact of an oar with the water.
noun
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(countable, phonetics) A stoppage of breath, resembling a slight cough.
noun
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Passing opportunities seized; snatches.
noun
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A slight remembrance; a trace.
noun
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To capture, overtake.
  • To capture or snare (someone or something which would rather escape). syn. [from 13th c.]
    I hope I catch a fish.
    He ran but we caught him at the exit.
    The police caught the robber at a nearby casino.
  • To entrap or trip up a person; to deceive. [from 14th c.]
  • (figuratively, dated) To marry or enter into a similar relationship with.
  • To reach (someone) with a strike, blow, weapon etc. [from 16th c.]
    If he catches you on the chin, you'll be on the mat.
  • To overtake or catch up to; to be in time for. [from 17th c.]
    If you leave now you might catch him.
    I would love to have dinner but I have to catch a plane.
  • To discover unexpectedly; to surprise (someone doing something). [from 17th c.]
    He was caught on video robbing the bank.
    He was caught in the act of stealing a biscuit.
  • To travel by means of. [from 19th c.]
    Catch the bus.
  • (rare) To become pregnant. (Only in past tense or as participle.) [from 19th c.]
verb
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To seize hold of.
  • (dated) To grab, seize, take hold of. [from 13th c.]
    I caught her by the arm and turned her to face me.
  • To take or replenish something necessary, such as breath or sleep. [from 14th c.]
    I have to stop for a moment and catch my breath.
    I caught some Z's on the train.
  • To grip or entangle. [from 17th c.]
    My leg was caught in a tree-root.
  • (intransitive) To be held back or impeded.
    Be careful your dress doesn't catch on that knob.
    His voice caught when he came to his father's name.
  • (intransitive) To engage with some mechanism; to stick, to succeed in interacting with something or initiating some process. transl.
    Push it in until it catches.
    The engine finally caught and roared to life.
  • To have something be held back or impeded.
    I caught my heel on the threshold.
  • (intransitive) To make a grasping or snatching motion (at). [from 17th c.]
    He caught at the railing as he fell.
  • Of fire, to spread or be conveyed to. [from 18th c.]
    The fire spread slowly until it caught the eaves of the barn.
  • (rowing) To grip (the water) with one's oars at the beginning of the stroke. [from 19th c.]
  • (intransitive, agriculture) To germinate and set down roots. [from 19th c.]
    The seeds caught and grew.
  • (surfing) To contact a wave in such a way that one can ride it back to shore.
  • (computing) To handle an exception. transl. [from 20th c.]
    When the program catches an exception, this is recorded in the log file.
verb
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To intercept.
  • To seize or intercept a object moving through the air (or, sometimes, some other medium). syn. transl. [from 16th c.]
    I will throw you the ball, and you catch it.
    Watch me catch this raisin in my mouth.
  • (now rare) To seize (an opportunity) when it occurs. transl. [from 16th c.]
  • (cricket) To end a player's innings by catching a hit ball before the first bounce. [from 18th c.]
    Townsend hit 29 before he was caught by Wilson.
  • (intransitive, baseball) To play (a specific period of time) as the catcher. [from 19th c.]
    He caught the last three innings.
verb
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To receive (by being in the way).
  • To be the victim of (something unpleasant, painful etc.). [from 13th c.]
    You're going to catch a beating if they find out.
  • To be touched or affected by (something) through exposure. [from 13th c.]
    The sunlight caught the leaves and the trees turned to gold.
    Her hair was caught by the light breeze.
  • To be infected by (an illness). [from 16th c.]
    Everyone seems to be catching the flu this week.
  • (intransitive) To spread by infection or similar means.
  • (intransitive) To receive or be affected by (wind, water, fire etc.). [from 18th c.]
    The bucket catches water from the downspout.
    The trees caught quickly in the dry wind.
  • To acquire, as though by infection; to take on through sympathy or infection. [from 16th c.]
    She finally caught the mood of the occasion.
  • To be hit by something. syn.
    He caught a bullet in the back of the head last year.
  • (intransitive) To serve well or poorly for catching, especially for catching fish.
  • (intransitive) To get pregnant.
    Well, if you didn't catch this time, we'll have more fun trying again until you do.
verb
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To take in with one's senses or intellect.
  • To grasp mentally: perceive and understand. transl. [from 16th c.]
    Did you catch his name?.
    Did you catch the way she looked at him?.
  • To take in; to watch or listen to (an entertainment). [from 20th c.]
    I have some free time tonight so I think I'll catch a movie.
  • To reproduce or echo a spirit or idea faithfully. [from 17th c.]
    You've really caught his determination in this sketch.
verb
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To seize attention, interest.
  • To charm or entrance. [from 14th c.]
  • To attract and hold (a faculty or organ of sense). [from 17th c.]
    He managed to catch her attention.
    The enormous scarf did catch my eye.
verb
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The definition of a catch is something that one traps or a game of throwing a ball.

An example of catch is a prize fish.

An example of catch is how baseball players warm up for a game.

noun
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catch fire
  • To ignite.
  • To become very enthusiastic.
  • To become the subject of great interest and widespread enthusiasm:
    An idea that caught fire all over the country.
idiom
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(informal) catch it
  • To receive a punishment or scolding.
idiom
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catch (one's) breath
  • To rest so as to be able to continue an activity.
idiom
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catch (one's) death
  • To catch a cold or other illness.
idiom
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catch up with
  • To find or arrest after a period of pursuit:
    The police finally caught up with him in Omaha.
  • To have unpleasant consequences for, especially after a period of quiescence:
    Mistakes that caught up with him when he ran for president.
idiom
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catch you later
  • Used to express good-bye.
idiom
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catch as catch can
  • with any hold, approach, technique, etc.
idiom
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catch at
  • to try to catch
  • to reach for eagerly; seize desperately
idiom
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catch it
  • to receive a scolding or other punishment
idiom
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catch on
  • to grasp the meaning; understand
  • to become fashionable or popular
idiom
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catch oneself
  • to hold oneself back abruptly from saying or doing something
idiom
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catch out
  • to take notice of a person's error, inconsistency, or unacceptable action
idiom
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catch up
  • to take or lift up suddenly; seize; snatch
  • to show to be in error
  • to come up even, as by hurrying or by extra work; overtake
  • to fasten in loops
idiom
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catch up on
  • to engage in more (work, sleep, etc.) so as to compensate for earlier neglect
idiom
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Origin of catch

  • Middle English cacchen from Old North French cachier to chase from Vulgar Latin captiāre chase1

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • After Catch-22 a novel by Joseph Heller

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English cacchen, from Anglo-Norman cachier, from Old Northern French, from Late Latin captiare, from Latin captare. Akin to Modern French chasser (from Old French chacier, whence English chase), Spanish cazar.

    From Wiktionary