Snag meaning

snăg
To snag is defined as to break, destroy or tear by getting caught on something.

An example of to snag is for a shirt to get caught on a nail and rip.

verb
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An unexpected or hidden obstacle, difficulty, etc.
noun
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The definition of a snag is something sharp that sticks out or a loop of thread that pokes out of a knitted garment.

An example of a snag is a sharp piece of wood sticking out from a cabinet.

An example of a snag is a pulled thread in a sweater.

noun
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A rough, sharp, or jagged protuberance, as:
  • A dead or partly dead tree that is still standing.
  • A tree or a part of a tree that is sunken in or protrudes above a body of water and is a danger to navigation.
  • A snaggletooth.
  • A short or imperfectly developed branch of a deer's antler.
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A break, pull, or tear in fabric.
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An unforeseen or hidden obstacle or difficulty.

Our plans for the party have hit a snag.

noun
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To tear, break, hinder, or destroy by or as if by a snag.

Snagged a stocking on a splinter.

verb
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To catch or obtain quickly or unexpectedly.

Snagged a ground ball; snagged a bargain.

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To free of snags.

Snagged the river.

verb
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To catch (a fish), especially by hooking in a place other than its mouth.
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To be damaged by a snag.

His sweater snagged on a tree branch.

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A piece, part, or point that sticks out, esp. one that is sharp or rough, as the broken end of a tree limb.
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An underwater tree stump or branch dangerous to navigation.
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A broken or irregular tooth.
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A small branch of an antler.
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To catch, tear, etc. on a snag.
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To impede with or as with a snag.
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To catch or grab quickly.
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To become caught or impeded by a sharp projection, a difficulty, etc.
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To strike or become caught on a snag in water.
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To form or develop a snag.
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A stump or base of a branch that has been lopped off; a short branch, or a sharp or rough branch; a knot; a protuberance.
noun
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Any sharp protuberant part of an object, which may catch, scratch, or tear other objects brought into contact with it.
noun
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A tooth projecting beyond the rest; a broken or decayed tooth.

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A tree, or a branch of a tree, fixed in the bottom of a river or other navigable water, and rising nearly or quite to the surface, by which boats are sometimes pierced and sunk.
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(figuratively) A problem or difficulty with something.
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A pulled thread or yarn, as in cloth.
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One of the secondary branches of an antler.
noun
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To catch or tear (e.g. fabric) upon a rough surface or projection.

Be careful not to snag your stockings on that concrete bench!

verb
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(fishing) To fish by means of dragging a large hook or hooks on a line, intending to impale the body (rather than the mouth) of the target.

We snagged for spoonbill from the eastern shore of the Mississippi river.

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(slang) To obtain or pick up (something).

Ella snagged a bottle of water from the fridge before leaving for her jog.

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(UK, dialect) To cut the snags or branches from, as the stem of a tree; to hew roughly.

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(Australia, informal, colloquial) A sausage. [From 1941.]
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A misnaged, an opponent to Chassidic Judaism (more likely modern, for cultural reasons).
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Origin of snag

  • Of Scandinavian origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old Norse snagi (“clothes peg").

    From Wiktionary