Problem meaning

prŏb'ləm
Dealing with a moral or social problem.

A problem play.

adjective
10
1
A question to be considered, solved, or answered.

Math problems.

noun
9
9
A question, matter, situation, or person that is perplexing or difficult.
noun
6
0
A question to be answered, schoolwork exercise.
noun
5
1
noun
3
0
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A misgiving, objection, or complaint.

I have a problem with his cynicism.

noun
0
0
A proposition requiring solution by mathematical operations, constructions, etc.
noun
0
0
Presenting a problem of human conduct or social relationships.

A problem novel.

adjective
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0
Very difficult to deal with; esp., very difficult to train or discipline.

A problem child.

adjective
0
0
A difficulty that has to be resolved or dealt with.

She's leaving because she faced numerous problems to do with racism.

noun
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Difficult to train or guide; unruly.
adjective
0
0
The definition of a problem is something that has to be solved or an unpleasant or undesirable condition that needs to be corrected.

An example of a problem is an algebra equation.

An example of a problem is when it is raining and you don't have an umbrella.

noun
0
1
Difficult to deal with or control.

A problem child.

adjective
0
1
A question proposed for solution or consideration.
noun
0
1
no problem
  • Used to express confirmation of or compliance with a request.
  • Used to acknowledge an expression of gratitude.
idiom
0
0
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have a problem with
  • To be unable to understand or do.
    She has a problem with French verbs.
  • To disagree with; disapprove of.
    I have a problem with your plans to paint the kitchen purple.
idiom
0
0
no problem!
  • Yes!; I will do what you ask!.
  • Easily done!.
  • You're welcome!.
idiom
0
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

have a problem with

Origin of problem

  • Middle English probleme from Old French from Latin problēma problēmat- from Greek from proballein to throw before, put forward pro- before pro–2 ballein blē- to throw gwelə- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English, from Old French, from Latin problema, from Ancient Greek πρόβλημα (problema, “anything thrown forward, hindrance, obstacle, anything projecting, a headland, promontory"), from προβάλλω (proballo, “to throw or lay something in front of someone, to put forward"), from προ- (pro-, “in front of") + βάλλω (ballo, “to throw, to cast, to hurl").
    From Wiktionary