Clog meaning

klôg, klŏg
An obstruction or hindrance.
noun
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A weight, such as a block, attached to the leg of an animal to hinder movement.
noun
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To hamper the function or activity of; impede.
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To become obstructed or choked up.

The pipes had clogged with rust.

verb
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To thicken or stick together; clot.
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To do a clog dance.
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A weight fastened to the leg of an animal to hinder motion.
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Anything that hinders or obstructs; hindrance.
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A shoe, sandal, etc. with a thick, usually wooden, sole: light clogs are used in clog dancing.
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To hinder; impede.
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To fill with obstructions or with thick, sticky matter; stop up; jam.
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To become stopped up.
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To become thick or sticky, so as to clog.
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To do a clog dance.
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A type of shoe with an inflexible, often wooden sole sometimes with an open heel.

Dutch people rarely wear clogs these days.

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The plumber cleared the clog from the drain.

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(UK, colloquial) A shoe of any type.
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A weight, such as a log or block of wood, attached to a person or animal to hinder motion.
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That which hinders or impedes motion; an encumbrance, restraint, or impediment of any kind.
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To block or slow passage through (often with 'up').

Hair is clogging the drainpipe.

The roads are clogged up with traffic.

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To encumber or load, especially with something that impedes motion; to hamper.
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To burden; to trammel; to embarrass; to perplex.
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A heavy, traditionally wooden-soled shoe.
noun
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To obstruct movement on or in; block up.

Heavy traffic clogged the freeways.

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Origin of clog

  • Middle English block attached to an animal's leg

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English clog (“weight attached to the leg of an animal to impede movement”)

    From Wiktionary