Occlusion meaning

ə-klo͝ozhən
Occlusion is defined as fitting together or obstructing.

An example of an occlusion is when the top and bottom teeth fit together when the jaws are closed together.

An example of an occlusion is when a blood vessel is blocked.

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An obstruction of an anatomical passage, as of an artery by plaque.
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Closure at some point in the vocal tract that blocks the flow of air in the production of an oral or nasal stop.
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An obstruction of an anatomical passage, as of an artery by plaque.
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The alignment of the teeth of the upper and lower jaws when brought together.
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An occluding or being occluded.
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The fitting together of the upper and lower teeth, or the way in which these fit together when the jaws are closed.
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The complete closing of the air passages in pronunciation, as of a stop.
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The alignment of the teeth of the upper and lower jaws when brought together.
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The alignment of the upper and lower sets of teeth with each other.
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The process of occluding, or something that occludes.
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(medicine) Anything that obstructs or closes a vessel or canal.
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(medicine, dentistry) The alignment of the teeth when upper and lower jaws are brought together.
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(meteorology) An occluded front.
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(linguistics) A closure within the vocal tract that produces an oral stop or nasal stop.
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(physics) The absorption of a gas or liquid by a substance such as a metal.
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(computing) The blocking of the view of part of an image by another.
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An obstruction in a passageway, especially of the body.
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Origin of occlusion

  • From Latin occlūsus past participle of occlūdere to occlude occlude

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From the post-Classical Latin occlÅ«siō (“occluding", “obstruction"), from the Classical Latin occlÅ«dō (“I shut up or close up", “I restrain"), from ob + claudō (“I shut or close").

    From Wiktionary