Skid meaning

skĭd
To skid is to move or slide because of a loss of traction, or to decline or deteriorate.

When your car goes out of control on a patch of ice and starts slipping along the road, this is an example of a time when you skid.

If you go too fast on a patch of ice and cause your car to slip out of control, this is an example of a time when you skid your car.

If the sales of a company go down from 100 units a month to 5 units a month, this is an example of a time when the sales figures skid.

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The action of sliding or slipping over a surface, often sideways.
noun
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A wooden framework attached to the side of a ship to prevent damage, as when unloading.
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A shoe or drag applying pressure to a wheel to brake a vehicle.
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To slide, especially roughly or heavily.

The crate broke loose and skidded across the slanting deck.

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To move sideways in a turn because of insufficient banking. Used of an airplane.
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To fall or decline sharply.
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To brake (a wheel) with a skid.
verb
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To haul on a skid or skids.
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A plank, log, etc., often one of a pair or set, used as a support or as a track upon which to slide or roll a heavy object.
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A low, movable wooden platform for holding loads or stacks.
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A runner used in place of a wheel on aircraft landing gear.
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A sliding wedge or drag used to check the motion of a vehicle by pressure against a wheel.
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The act of skidding.
noun
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To brake or lock (a wheel) with a skid.
verb
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To support with or slide on a skid or skids.
verb
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To haul, roll, or drag (logs) along a special track or trail, as through a forest.
verb
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To cause (a wheel, vehicle, etc.) to slide or slip.
verb
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To slide without turning, as a wheel when skids or brakes are applied on a slippery surface.
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To slide or slip sideways, as a vehicle when not gripping the road on ice.
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To slide sharply downward.
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To slide outward while turning, as a result of failing to bank sufficiently.
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An out-of-control sliding motion as would result from applying the brakes too hard in a car.

Just before hitting the guardrail the driver was able to regain control and pull out of the skid.

noun
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A shoe or clog, as of iron, attached to a chain, and placed under the wheel of a wagon to prevent its turning when descending a steep hill; a drag; a skidpan.
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(by extension) A hook attached to a chain, used for the same purpose.
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A piece of timber or other material used as a support, or to receive pressure.
  • A runner of a sled.
    In the hours before daylight he sharpened the skids and tightened the lashings to prepare for the long dogsled journey.
  • A ski-shaped runner or supporting surface as found on a helicopter or other aircraft in place of wheels.
    Due to frequent arctic travel, the plane was equipped with long skids for snow and ice landings.
  • A basic platform for the storage and transport of goods, machinery or equipment, later developed into the pallet.
    He unloaded six skids of boxes from the truck.
  • (nautical, in the plural) Large fenders hung over a vessel's side to protect it when handling cargo.
  • One of a pair of horizontal rails or timbers for supporting anything, such as a boat or barrel.
noun
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(intransitive) To slide in an uncontrolled manner as in a car with the brakes applied too hard.

They skidded around the corner and accelerated up the street.

verb
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To protect or support with a skid or skids.
verb
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To cause to move on skids.
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To check or halt (wagon wheels, etc.) with a skid.

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A runner in the landing gear of certain aircraft.
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be on the skids
  • To be on the decline or downgrade; meet with failure.
idiom
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put the skids under
  • To thwart or cause to fail.
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

be on the skids
put the skids under

Origin of skid

  • Perhaps of Scandinavian origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition