Trig meaning

trĭg
The definition of trig is in good condition, neat or precise.

An example of something trig is a recently polished car.

adjective
0
0
Trig is defined as to make something clean or neat, or to prevent something from rolling.

An example of trig is to polish a table.

An example of trig is to put a stone under a wheel to keep it from rolling forward.

verb
0
0
Trig is short for trigonometry, or is defined as a wedge to prevent rolling.

An example of trig is a high school mathematics class.

An example of a trig is a rock.

noun
0
0
Smart and trim, as in appearance; neat.

A trig beard.

adjective
0
0
To make trim or neat, especially in dress.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
To stop (a wheel) from rolling, as with a wedge.
verb
0
0
Trigonometry.
noun
0
0
Trim; neat; spruce.
adjective
0
0
In good condition; strong; sound.
adjective
0
0
Prim; precise.
adjective
0
0
Advertisement
To make trig.
verb
0
0
To prevent (a wheel, cask, etc.) from rolling by placing a wedge, stone, etc. under it.
verb
0
0
To prop or support.
verb
0
0
A stone, wedge, etc. used in trigging.
noun
0
0
noun
0
0
Advertisement
Trigonometric(al)
abbreviation
0
0
(now chiefly dialectal) True; trusty; trustworthy; faithful.
adjective
0
0
(now chiefly dialectal) Safe; secure.
adjective
0
0
(now chiefly dialectal) Tight; firm; steady; sound; in good condition or health.
adjective
0
0
adjective
0
0
Advertisement
(now chiefly dialectal) Active; clever.
adjective
0
0
(now chiefly dialectal) A dandy; coxcomb.
noun
0
0
(uncountable) Trigonometry.
noun
0
0
(countable, informal) A trigonometric point.
noun
0
0
(UK) A stone, block of wood, or anything else, placed under a wheel or barrel to prevent motion; a scotch; a skid.

noun
0
0
Advertisement
To stop (a wheel, barrel, etc.) by placing something under it; to scotch; to skid.
verb
0
0
To fill; to stuff; to cram.

verb
0
0

Origin of trig

  • Middle English true from Old Norse tryggr loyal, true deru- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Perhaps of Scandinavian origin Old Norse tryggr firm trig1

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English trig, tryg, Old Norse tryggr (“loyal, faithful, true"), from Proto-Germanic *triwwiz (“loyal, faithful, true"). Cognate with Old English trÄ“owe (“faithful, loyal, true"). More at true.

    From Wiktionary

  • Compare Danish trykke (“to press").

    From Wiktionary

  • Abbreviation of trigonometry.

    From Wiktionary

  • See trigger.

    From Wiktionary