Shackle meaning

shăkəl
A hobble for an animal.
noun
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A device, usually one of a pair connected to a chain, that encircles the ankle or wrist of a prisoner or captive.
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Anything that restrains freedom of expression or action.

The shackles of ignorance.

noun
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To fasten or connect with a shackle.
verb
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To restrict, confine, or hamper.
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A metal fastening, usually one of a linked pair, for the wrist or ankle of a prisoner; fetter; manacle.
noun
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Any of several devices used in fastening or coupling.
noun
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To put shackles on; fetter.
verb
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To fasten or connect with a shackle or shackles.
verb
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To restrain in freedom of expression or action.
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A restraint fit over a human or animal appendage, such as a wrist, ankle or finger. Usually used in plural, to indicate a pair joined by a chain; a hobble.
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A U-shaped piece of metal secured with a pin or bolt across the opening, or a hinged metal loop secured with a quick-release locking pin mechanism.
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(figuratively, usually in plural) A restraint on one's action, activity, or progress.
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A fetter-like band worn as an ornament.
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A link for connecting railroad cars; a drawlink or draglink.
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noun
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To restrain using shackles; to place in shackles.
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By extension, to render immobile or incapable; to inhibit the progress or abilities of someone or something.

This law would effectively shackle its opposition.

verb
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The definition of a shackle is a literal or figurative restraint that keeps you in place or prevents you from doing what you want.

The chains that bind a prisoner's hands to his ankles are an example of a shackle.

If you believe you can't achieve your dreams, this belief is an example of a shackle.

noun
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Any of several devices, such as a clevis, used to fasten or couple.
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A restraint or check on action or progress.
noun
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To put shackles on (someone); confine with shackles.
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Origin of shackle

  • Middle English schackel from Old English sceacel fetter

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English schakkyl, schakle, from Old English sceacel, sceacul, scacul (“shackle, bond, fetter"), from Proto-Germanic *skakulaz (“shackle"), from Proto-Indo-European *skeg-, *skek- (“to jump, move, shake, stir"), equivalent to shake +"Ž -le. Cognate with Dutch schakel (“link, shackle, clasp"), German Schäckel (“shackle"), Danish skagle (“a carriage trace"), Swedish skakel (“the loose shaft of a carriage"), Icelandic skökull (“a carriage pole").

    From Wiktionary