Yoke definition

yōk
A pair of animals harnessed together.

A yoke of oxen.

noun
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To force into heavy labor, bondage, or subjugation.
verb
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The amount of land ploughed in a day by a pair of oxen.

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The definition of yoke is the bar that is used as a frame to pull or support something heavy.

1. An example of yoke is the wood that oxen are hooked to on an old-style plow. 2. A bar used across the shoulders to balance a load equally on both sides is an example of a yoke. 3. The frame that a heavy bell is hung on is an example of a yoke.

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(electronics) A series of two or more magnetic recording heads fastened securely together for playing or recording on more than one track simultaneously.
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A contoured crossbar having two U-shaped attachments that fit around the necks of a team of oxen or other draft animals, with a central ring for hitching the team to a cart, plow, or other load.
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A pair of draft animals, such as oxen, joined by a yoke.
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Any of various emblems of subjugation, such as a structure made of two upright spears with a third laid across them, under which conquered enemies of ancient Rome were forced to march in subjection.
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The condition of being subjugated by or as if by a conqueror; subjugation or bondage.

14th-century Russia under the Tatar yoke; the yoke of drug addiction.

noun
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To harness a draft animal to.
verb
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To harness (a draft animal) to a vehicle or an implement.
verb
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To become joined.
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(electronics) An assembly of coils and magnetic material placed about the neck of a cathode-ray tube to provide electromagnetic deflection fields for the electron beam.
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A device symbolizing a yoke, as an arch of spears, under which the conquered were forced to pass in ancient times.
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Any mark or symbol of bondage or servitude.
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Subjection; bondage; servitude.
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(rare) To enslave.
verb
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To join together; link.
verb
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To join in marriage.
verb
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A bar or frame of wood by which two oxen are joined at the heads or necks for working together.
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A pair (of animals, especially oxen).
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A frame made to fit the neck and shoulders of a person, used for carrying a pair of buckets, etc., one at each end of the frame.
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A frame worn on the neck of an animal, such as a cow, pig, or goose, to prevent passage through a fence.
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(figuratively) A burden; something which represses or restrains a person.
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A frame or convex piece by which a bell is hung for ringing it.
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The part of a shirt that stretches over the shoulders, usually made out of a doubled piece of fabric. Or, a pair of fabric panels on trousers (especially jeans) or a skirt, across the back of the garment below the waistband.
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(bodybuilding) Well-developed muscles of the neck and shoulders.
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(aviation) The column-mounted control wheel of an aircraft.
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(electronics) The electro-magnetic coil that deflects the electron beam in a CRT (Cathode Ray Tube).
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(nautical) A fitting placed across the head of the rudder with a line attached at each end by which a boat may be steered. In modern use it is primarily found in sailing canoes and kayaks.
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(agriculture, dated, uncommon) An alternative name for a cowpoke.
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(glassblowing) A Y-shaped stand used to support a blowpipe or punty while reheating in the glory hole.
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(engineering) A bent crosspiece connecting two other parts.
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A tie securing two timbers together, not used for part of a regular truss, but serving a temporary purpose, as to provide against unusual strain.
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(dressmaking) A band shaped to fit the shoulders or the hips, and joined to the upper full edge of the waist or the skirt.
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A portion of the working day.

To work two yokes, i.e. to work both morning and afternoon.

noun
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(informal, Ireland) A miscellaneous object; a gadget.
noun
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Common misspelling of yolk.
noun
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To link or to join.
verb
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To unite, to connect.
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To enslave; to bring into bondage; to restrain; to confine.
verb
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Something that binds, unites, or connects.

The yoke of matrimony.

noun
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(elec.) A piece of magnetic material, without windings, that permanently connects two or more magnet cores.
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A bar used with a double harness to connect the collar of each horse to the pole of a wagon or coach.
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A frame designed to be carried across a person's shoulders with equal loads suspended from each end.
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A piece of a garment that is closely fitted, either around the neck and shoulders or at the hips, and from which an unfitted or gathered part of the garment is hung.
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A wooden frame or bar with loops or bows at either end, fitted around the necks of a pair of oxen, etc. for harnessing them together.
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(nautical) A crossbar on a ship's rudder to which the steering cables are connected.
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A clamp or vise that holds a machine part in place or controls its movement or that holds two such parts together.
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Something that connects or joins together; a bond or tie.
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To fit or join with a yoke.
verb
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To join together; bind.

Partners who were yoked together for life.

verb
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Something like a yoke in shape or function.
  • A frame fitting over the shoulders for carrying pails, etc., one on either end.
  • A clamp, coupling, slotted piece, etc. used to hold two parts together.
  • A crosspiece on a boat's rudder, to which the steering cables are attached.
  • The bar used in double harnessing to connect the horse's collar to the tongue of the wagon or carriage.
noun
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A part of a garment fitted closely to the shoulders, as of a dress, or to the hips, as of a skirt, as a support for gathered parts.
noun
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To put a yoke on.
verb
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To harness (an animal) to (a plow, etc.)
verb
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To be joined together or closely united.
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
yoke
Plural:
yokes

Origin of yoke

  • Middle English from Old English geoc yeug- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old English Ä¡eoc, from Proto-Germanic *jukÄ…, from Proto-Indo-European *yugóm. Cognate with West Frisian jok, Dutch juk, German Joch, Danish Ã¥g, Swedish ok, Gothic 𐌾𐌿𐌺 (juk), Latin iugum (English jugular), Greek ζυγός (zugós, “yoke"), Sanskrit युग (yugá, “yoke, team"), Old Church Slavonic иго (igo) (Russian иго (igo)), Persian یوغ (yuÄŸ). Compare yoga.

    From Wiktionary