Conjugate meaning

kŏn'jə-gāt'
The definition of conjugate is two or more things joined together.

An example of conjugate is a relationship when the people are married.

adjective
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3
To inflect (a verb) in its forms for distinctions such as number, person, voice, mood, and tense.
verb
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3
To join together.
verb
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2
Conjugate means to join or unite two or more things or people together or to give different forms to a word to reflect a different person, voice or number.

An example of conjugate is an official declaring two people married.

An example of conjugate is to show different forms of the word "be" such as was, were, being and been.

verb
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1
Inversely or oppositely related with respect to one of a group of otherwise identical properties, especially designating either or both of a pair of complex numbers differing only in the sign of the imaginary term.
adjective
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1
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A conjugate word.
noun
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1
A chemical compound that has been formed by the joining of two or more compounds.
noun
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1
Derived from the same base and, usually, related in meaning.
adjective
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1
To undergo conjugation.
verb
1
2
To be inflected.
verb
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0
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Joined together, especially in a pair or pairs; coupled.
adjective
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Conjugated.
adjective
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Any of a set of numbers that satisfy the same irreducible polynomial.
noun
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A conjugate point, line, quantity, etc.
noun
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A chemically conjugated substance.
noun
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To join together; unite; couple.
verb
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To join (compounds) so that the resulting substance can be readily removed, as a toxic product in the body.
verb
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To inflect (a verb) systematically, giving its different forms according to voice, mood, tense, number, and person.
verb
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To unite in conjugation.
verb
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To undergo conjugation.
verb
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Joined together, especially in a pair or pairs; coupled.
adjective
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Conjugated.
adjective
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0
A chemical compound that has been formed by the joining of two or more compounds.
noun
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(grammar) To inflect (a verb) for each person, in order, for one or more tenses.

In English, the verb 'to be' is conjugated as follows: 'I am', 'you are', 'he/she/it is', 'we are', 'you are', 'they are'.

verb
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(rare) To join together, unite; to juxtapose.
verb
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(biology) To reproduce sexually as do some bacteria and algae, by exchanging or transferring DNA.
verb
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Any entity formed by joining two or more smaller entities together.
noun
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(mathematics) (of a complex number) A complex conjugate.
noun
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(mathematics) More generally, any of a set of irrational or complex numbers that are zeros of the same polynomial with integral coefficients.
noun
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(mathematics) An explementary angle.
noun
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(grammar) A word agreeing in derivation with another word, and therefore generally resembling it in meaning.
noun
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United in pairs; yoked together; coupled.
adjective
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(botany) In single pairs; coupled.
adjective
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(chemistry) Containing two or more radicals supposed to act the part of a single one.
adjective
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(grammar) Agreeing in derivation and radical signification; said of words.
adjective
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(mathematics) Presenting themselves simultaneously and having reciprocal properties; said of quantities, points, lines, axes, curves, etc.
adjective
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Derived from a common source, such as the words foul and filth.
adjective
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1
Joined together, esp. in a pair; coupled.
adjective
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1
adjective
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1
Specially related or having the same or similar properties, as two points, lines, or quantities.
adjective
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1
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Origin of conjugate

  • Latin coniugāre coniugāt- to join together com- com- iugāre to join (from iugum yoke yeug- in Indo-European roots)
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From the participle stem of Latin coniugāre (“to yoke together”), from con- + iugāre.
    From Wiktionary