Knot meaning

nŏt
A problem; difficulty; entanglement.
noun
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The definition of a knot is the looping and tying of a piece of string or rope, or the place where a tree limb joins the trunk.

An example of a knot is a tied shoelace.

An example of a knot is the cross-grained circular part on some boards.

noun
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A protuberant growth or swelling in a tissue.

A knot in a gland.

noun
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To knot is defined as to securely tie a rope or ribbon.

An example of to knot is to tie ribbon around a gift and secure the ribbon by making a loop in the ribbon and pulling a loose end of the ribbon through the loop.

verb
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A unifying bond, especially a marriage bond.
noun
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To tie, fasten, or intertwine in or with a knot or knots; make a knot or knots in.
verb
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A knotlike part; node or lump [a knot in a tense muscle]
  • A hard lump on a tree where a branch grows out.
  • A cross section of such a lump, appearing as cross-grained in a board or log.
  • A joint on a plant stem where two leaves grow out.
  • Any of several fungal diseases of trees, in which abnormal protuberances appear.
noun
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To tie or unite closely or intricately; entangle.
verb
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To make (fringe) by tying knots.
verb
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A decorative bow of ribbon, fabric, or braid.
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A tight cluster of persons or things.

A knot of onlookers.

noun
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A feeling of tightness.

A knot of fear in my stomach.

noun
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A complex problem.
noun
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(mathematics) A closed loop that is embedded in three-dimensional space and that can be intertwined with or tangled in itself, but that cannot intersect itself.
noun
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To tie in or fasten with a knot or knots.
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To snarl or entangle.
verb
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To cause to form a knot or knots.
verb
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To form a knot or knots.
verb
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To become snarled or entangled.
verb
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Either of two migratory sandpipers of the genus Calidris that breed in Arctic regions, especially the red knot.
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A lump or knob in a thread, cord, etc., formed by passing one free end through a loop and drawing it tight, or by a tangle drawn tight.
noun
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A fastening made by intertwining or tying together pieces of string, cord, rope, etc.
noun
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An ornamental bow of ribbon or twist of braid; cockade; epaulet.
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A small group or cluster.
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Something that ties or fastens closely or intricately; bond of union; esp., the bond of marriage.
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To form a knot or knots; become entangled.
verb
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To make knots for fringe.
verb
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Any of various sandpipers (genus Calidris); esp., a large, migratory species (C. canutus) that breeds in arctic regions.
noun
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A protuberant growth or swelling in a tissue.

A knot in a gland.

noun
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A looping of a piece of string or of any other long, flexible material that cannot be untangled without passing one or both ends of the material through its loops.

Climbers must make sure that all knots are both secure and of types that will not weaken the rope.

noun
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(of hair, etc) A tangled clump.

The nurse was brushing knots from the protesting child's hair.

noun
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A maze-like pattern.
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(mathematics) A non-self-intersecting closed curve in (e.g., three-dimensional) space that is an abstraction of a knot (in sense 1 above).

A knot can be defined as a non-self-intersecting broken line whose endpoints coincide: when such a knot is constrained to lie in a plane, then it is simply a polygon.

A knot in its original sense can be modeled as a mathematical knot (link) as follows: if the knot is made with a single piece of rope, then abstract the shape of that rope and then extend the working end to merge it with the standing end, yielding a mathematical knot. If the knot is attached to a metal ring, then that metal ring can be modeled as a trivial knot and the pair of knots become a link. If more than one mathematical knot (link) can be thus obtained, then the simplest one (avoiding detours) is probably the one which one would want.

noun
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A difficult situation.

I got into a knot when I inadvertently insulted a policeman.

noun
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The whorl left in lumber by the base of a branch growing out of the tree's trunk.

When preparing to tell stories at a campfire, I like to set aside a pile of pine logs with lots of knots, since they burn brighter and make dramatic pops and cracks.

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Local swelling in a tissue area, especially skin, often due to injury.

Jeremy had a knot on his head where he had bumped it on the bedframe.

noun
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noun
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Any knob, lump, swelling, or protuberance.
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The point on which the action of a story depends; the gist of a matter.

The knot of the tale.

noun
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(engineering) A node.
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A kind of epaulet; a shoulder knot.
noun
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A group of people or things.
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A bond of union; a connection; a tie.
noun
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To form into a knot; to tie with a knot or knots.

We knotted the ends of the rope to keep it from unravelling.

verb
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To form wrinkles in the forehead, as a sign of concentration, concern, surprise, etc.

She knotted her brow in concentration while attempting to unravel the tangled strands.

verb
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To unite closely; to knit together.

verb
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(nautical) A unit of speed, equal to one nautical mile per hour.

Cedric claimed his old yacht could make 12 knots.

noun
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(slang) A nautical mile (incorrectly)
noun
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One of a variety of shore birds; the red-breasted sandpiper (variously Calidris canutus or Tringa canutus).
noun
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tie the knot
  • to get married
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of knot

  • Middle English from Old English cnotta

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English of Scandinavian origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old English cnotta, from Proto-Germanic *knuttan-; (cognate with Old High German knoto (German Knoten, Dutch knot, Low German Knütte); compare also Old Norse knútr > Danish knude, Swedish knut, Norwegian knute, Icelandic hnútur). Probably ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *nod- (“to bind”), cf. Latin nodus and its Romance successors.

    From Wiktionary

  • From the practice of counting the number of knots in the log-line (as it plays out) in a standard time. Traditionally spaced at one every 1/120th of a mile.

    From Wiktionary

  • Supposed to be derived from the name of King Canute, with whom the bird was a favourite article of food. See the species epithet canutus.

    From Wiktionary