Bunch definitions

bŭnch
A group of people usually having a common interest or association.

My brother and his bunch are basketball fanatics.

noun
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2
A considerable number or amount; a lot.

A bunch of trouble; a whole bunch of food.

noun
93
2
A small lump or swelling; a bump.
noun
90
1
To gather or form into a cluster.

Bunched my fingers into a fist.

verb
87
1
To gather together into a group.
verb
84
1
To gather (fabric) into folds.
verb
81
1
To form a cluster or group.

Runners bunching up at the starting line.

verb
78
0
To be gathered together in folds, as fabric.
verb
75
2
To swell; protrude.
verb
72
1
A cluster or tuft of things growing together.

A bunch of grapes.

noun
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0
A collection of things of the same kind fastened or grouped together, or regarded as belonging together.

A bunch of keys.

noun
55
1
A group of people, esp. of the same kind.
noun
52
0
A hump or protuberance.
noun
48
1
To form or collect into a bunch or bunches; gather together in a mass.
verb
45
1
To gather into loose folds or wads, as a dress, skirt, etc.
verb
42
0
The definition of a bunch is a cluster, collection or group of something gathered together.

An example of a bunch is a group of flowers tied together.

noun
15
0
A group of a number of similar things, either growing together, or in a cluster or clump, usually fastened together.

A bunch of grapes; a bunch of bananas; a bunch of keys; a bunch of yobs on a street corner.

noun
12
0
(informal) An unmentioned amount; a number.

A bunch of them went down to the field.

noun
12
0
Bunch means to form, collect or gather up into a mass.

An example of bunch is to gather a group of flowers and tie them together with a ribbon.

verb
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0
(cycling) The peloton; the main group of riders formed during a race.
noun
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0
(forestry) A group of logs tied together for skidding.
noun
9
0

He still hangs out with the same bunch.

noun
6
0
(geology, mining) An unusual concentration of ore in a lode or a small, discontinuous occurrence or patch of ore in the wallrock.

noun
6
0
(informal) A considerable amount.

A bunch of trouble.

noun
3
0
(textiles) The reserve yarn on the filling bobbin to allow continuous weaving between the time of indication from the midget feeler until a new bobbin is put in the shuttle.
noun
3
0
A group of things growing close together; a cluster or clump.

A bunch of grapes; grass growing in bunches.

noun
0
0
A group of like items or individuals gathered or placed together.

A bunch of keys on a ring; people standing around in bunches.

noun
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0
(Burroughs, Univac, NCR, Control Data, Honeywell) In the early 1970s, after RCA and GE exited the business, the computer industry was known as "IBM and the BUNCH." From the 1960s to the 1990s, IBM was the most influential computer company in the world. See GAFA, Big Five and IBM.
0
0
An unfinished cigar, before the wrapper leaf is added.

Two to four filler leaves are laid end to end and rolled into the two halves of the binder leaves, making up what is called the bunch.

noun
0
0
A protuberance; a hunch; a knob or lump; a hump.
noun
0
0
To gather into a bunch.
verb
0
0
To gather fabric into folds.
verb
0
0
(intransitive) To form a bunch.
verb
0
0
(intransitive) To be gathered together in folds.
verb
0
0
(intransitive) To protrude or swell.
verb
0
0

Origin of bunch

From Middle English bunche (“hump, swelling”), variant of *bunge (compare dialectal English bung (“heap, grape bunch”)), from Proto-Germanic *bunkōn, *bunkan, *bungōn (“heap, crowd”) (compare West Frisian bonke (“bone, lump, bump”), German Bunge (“tuber”), Danish bunke (“heap, pile”)), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰenǵʰ-, *bʰéng̑ʰus (“thick, dense, fat”) (compare Hittite panku (“total, entire”), Tocharian B pkante (“volume, fatness”), Lithuanian búožė (“knob”), Ancient Greek παχύς (pachýs, “thick”), Sanskrit बहु (bahú, “thick; much”)).