Hitch definition

hĭch
To fasten, connect, or attach.

Hitched the horses to the sleigh.

verb
8
0
The definition of a hitch is a something used to connect or an obstacle.

An example of a hitch is a device for connecting a trailer to a truck.

An example of a hitch is a small problem getting the right flowers for a wedding.

noun
2
0
(informal) To get (a ride) by hitchhiking.

Hitched a ride to the rally.

verb
2
1
To move or raise by pulling or jerking.

Hitch up one's pants.

verb
2
2
(slang) To marry.

They got hitched last month.

verb
0
0
Advertisement
(informal) To hitchhike.
verb
0
0
To move jerkily.
verb
0
0
To move or walk haltingly.

He hitched along on his painful ankle.

verb
0
0
Any of various knots used as a temporary fastening.
noun
0
0
A device used to connect one thing to another.

A trailer hitch.

noun
0
0
Advertisement
A short jerking motion; a tug.

Answered with a hitch of her head.

noun
0
0
A hobble or limp.

A hitch in his step.

noun
0
0
An impediment or a delay.

A hitch in our plans.

noun
0
0
A term of service, especially of military service.
noun
0
0
(informal) A free ride obtained along a road.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
To move jerkily; walk haltingly; limp; hobble.
verb
0
0
To become fastened or caught, as by becoming entangled or hooking on to something.
verb
0
0
To strike the feet together in moving.
verb
0
0
(slang) To hitchhike.
verb
0
0
To move, pull, or shift with jerks.

Hitch your chair up to the table.

verb
0
0
Advertisement
To fasten with a hook, knot, harness, etc.; unite; tie.

To hitch a wagon to a tractor.

verb
0
0
(slang) To marry.

We got hitched last spring.

verb
0
0
(slang) To hitchhike.
verb
0
0
A short, sudden movement or pull; tug; jerk.
noun
0
0
A hobble; limp.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
A hindrance; obstacle; entanglement.
noun
0
0
A fastening or catch; thing or part used to connect or join together.

A trailer hitch fastened to the back of a car.

noun
0
0
(slang) A ride in hitchhiking.
noun
0
0
(slang) A period of time served, as of military service, imprisonment, etc.
noun
0
0
A kind of knot that can be easily undone, for fastening a line as to a ring or pole.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
noun
0
0
Any of various knots used to attach a rope to an object other than another rope . See List of hitch knots in Wikipedia.
noun
0
0

His truck sported a heavy-duty hitch for his boat.

noun
0
0
(informal) A problem, delay or source of difficulty.

The banquet went off without a hitch. (Meaning the banquet went smoothly.)

noun
0
0
A hidden or unfavorable condition or element; a catch.

The deal sounds too good to be true. What's the hitch?

noun
0
0
Advertisement
A period of time. Most often refers to time spent in the military.

She served two hitches in Vietnam.

U.S. TROOPS FACE LONGER ARMY HITCH ; SOLDIERS BOUND FOR IRAQ... WILL BE RETAINEDStephen J. Hedges & Mike Dorning, Chicago Tribune; Orlando Sentinel; Jun 3, 2004; pg. A.1;

noun
0
0
To pull with a jerk.

She hitched her jeans up and then tightened her belt.

verb
0
0
To attach, tie or fasten.

He hitched the bedroll to his backpack and went camping.

verb
0
0
(informal) To marry oneself to; especially to get hitched.
verb
0
0
(informal) Contraction of hitchhike, to thumb a ride.

To hitch a ride.

verb
0
0
Advertisement
(intransitive) To become entangled or caught; to be linked or yoked; to unite; to cling.
verb
0
0
(intransitive) To move interruptedly or with halts, jerks, or steps; said of something obstructed or impeded.
verb
0
0
(UK) To strike the legs together in going, as horses; to interfere.

verb
0
0
A surname​.
pronoun
0
0
Hitch is defined as to connect or to move with a jerking motion.

An example of hitch is to connect a horse to a carriage.

An example of hitch is to walk with a limp.

verb
0
1
Advertisement
without a hitch
  • without a problem or setback; smoothly, easily, and successfully
idiom
0
0

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
hitch
Plural:
hitches

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of hitch

  • Probably from Middle English hytchen, icchen to move, jerk

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From a medieval diminutive of the male give name Richard.

    From Wiktionary