Jerk meaning

jûrk
The definition of a jerk is slang for someone who treats others badly.

An example of jerk is someone who talks about their friends behind their backs.

noun
26
4
(slang) A foolish, rude, or contemptible person.
noun
19
1
(US, slang, vulgar) To masturbate.
verb
16
8
Jerk is defined as to pull, push or throw in a sharp sudden motion.

An example of jerk is someone quickly breaking away from another who has a hold on them.

verb
12
8
To give a sudden quick thrust, push, pull, or twist to.
verb
11
4
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(slang) A person regarded as disagreeable, contemptible, etc., esp. as the result of foolish or mean behavior.
noun
8
2
To throw or toss with a quick abrupt motion.
verb
4
2
Involuntary convulsive twitching often resulting from excitement. Often used with the.
noun
3
0
To move with a jerk or in jerks.
verb
3
0
(sports) To press (a weight) overhead from shoulder height in a quick motion.
verb
3
1
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To move in sudden abrupt motions; jolt.

The train jerked forward.

verb
3
1
A sudden abrupt motion, such as a yank or twist.
noun
2
0
A jolting or lurching motion.
noun
2
0
Being or relating to a method of barbecuing meat that has been seasoned and wrapped in leaves of the allspice tree.

Jerk chicken.

adjective
2
0
(informal, former) To make and serve (ice cream sodas)
verb
2
0
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To twitch.
verb
2
0
A sharp, abrupt movement; quick pull, twist, push, etc.
noun
2
0
(Caribbean) Meat cured by jerking; charqui.

Jerk chicken is a local favorite.

noun
2
0
To utter abruptly or sharply.

Jerked out the answer.

verb
2
1
(physiology) A sudden reflexive or spasmodic muscular movement.
noun
1
0
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(sports) A lift in which the weight is heaved overhead from shoulder height with a quick motion.
noun
1
0
A sudden muscular contraction caused by a reflex action.
noun
1
0
(intransitive) To make a sudden uncontrolled movement.
verb
1
0
To make spasmodic motions.

My legs jerked from fatigue.

verb
1
1
To cut (meat) into long strips and dry in the sun or cure by exposing to smoke.
verb
1
1
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A marinade consisting of habanero peppers, onions, vinegar, allspice, thyme, cinammon, etc., used in Jamaican cooking.
noun
1
1
(Caribbean) A rich, spicy Jamaican marinade.
noun
1
1
(weight lifting) A lift in which the barbell is raised upward from shoulder level with the arms completely extended.
noun
0
0
To preserve (meat) by slicing into strips and drying, esp. originally in the sun.
verb
0
0
noun
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0
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Marinated with jerk and barbecued.

Jerk chicken, pork, etc.

adjective
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0
A sudden, often uncontrolled movement, especially of the body.
noun
0
0
A quick, often unpleasant tug or shake.

When I yell "OK," give the mooring line a good jerk!

noun
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0
(US, slang, pejorative) A dull or stupid person.
noun
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0
(US, slang, pejorative) A person with unlikable or obnoxious qualities and behavior, typically mean, self-centered, or disagreeable.

I finally fired him, because he was being a real jerk to his customers, even to some of the staff.

You really are a jerk sometimes.

noun
0
0
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(physics, engineering) The rate of change in acceleration with respect to time.
noun
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0
(weightlifting) A lift in which the weight is taken with a quick motion from shoulder height to a position above the head with arms fully extended and held there for a brief time.
noun
0
0
To give a quick, often unpleasant tug or shake.
verb
0
0
(usually , weightlifting) To lift using a jerk.
verb
0
0
To cure (meat) by cutting it into strips and drying it, originally in the sun.
verb
0
0
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To pull, twist, push, thrust, or throw with a sudden, sharp movement.
verb
0
1
To make and serve (ice-cream sodas, for example) at a soda fountain.
verb
0
2
jerk off
  • to masturbate
idiom
0
0
jerk out
  • to utter sharply and abruptly
idiom
0
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

jerk out

Origin of jerk

  • Back-formation from jerky

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Origin unknown

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Probably from Middle English yerk (“sudden motion”), from Old English ġearc (“ready, active, quick”). Compare Old English ġearcian (“to prepare, make ready, procure, furnish, supply”). Related to yare.

    From Wiktionary

  • From American Spanish charquear, from charqui, from Quechuan echarqui (“strips of dried flesh”).

    From Wiktionary